2014 07 17 Essay

Submitted By cjripley
Words: 1902
Pages: 8

Police culture is a result of the type of job that police officers do day in and day out. According to Hess, Orthmann and Miller (2011), “… many police officers develop a fierce loyalty to each other. This unique conglomeration of organizational values, beliefs and expectations that is passed on to newcomers in the department is known as the police culture” (p. 36-37). Some positives of police culture are that it can act as a support system for police officers that are in a very difficult job. It creates a strong bond between people that have to rely on each other for protection and backup in very dangerous situations at times. There are some negatives in that it can create this feel of us versus them in that the police department is against the community rather than serving it. There is also the Code of Silence in which one police officer will not come forward about bad behavior that another officer is involved in to protect their brother in blue. Some members of the public can view the police as a necessary evil, and the media can have a big impact on public opinion by only reporting the negatives of the police department of the community.

References
Hess, K. M., Orthmann, C. M., & Miller, L. (2011). Community Policing: Partnerships for Problem Solving (6th ed.). Belmont, CA: Wadsworth Cengage Learning.

In England, there was a duty for citizens to assist in policing their own community, and this created the frankpledge system and the watches. Sir Robert Peel is considered the father of police work because of his work towards creating a police force. According to Hess, Orthmann and Miller (2011), “’Modern’ policing began with the formation of the London Metropolitan Police, founded by Sir Robert Peel in 1829” (p. 6). The United States has a very similar way that policing came about in that there was the watch system, but they took heed of the way that Sir Peel created the Metropolitan Police Force in London, and began modeling some of the larger city police departments after his model. The six principals that were set forward by Sir Robert Peel were that police officers have the duty to stop crime, the public grants the police to do their tasks based on approval, this approval will give the public incentive to assist the police, police officers have to earn their approval by performing their job correctly, police should have a give and take relationship with the community that they are a part of, and that the effectiveness of the police force is based on no crime in the area rather than the presence of police doing their job.

References
Hess, K. M., Orthmann, C. M., & Miller, L. (2011). Community Policing: Partnerships for Problem Solving (6th ed.). Belmont, CA: Wadsworth Cengage Learning.

There is certainly a relationship between community orientated policing and problem orientated policing. “Wilson and Kelling suggest that community policing requires the police mission to be redefined ‘to help the police become accustomed to fixing broken windows as well as arresting window-breakers’” (as cited by Hess, Orthmann and Miller, 2011, p. 91-92). The community can be vital in helping the police to identify the people that are involved with committing crimes in their neighborhood as witnesses and partners in creating a safe community, but they are also helpful in problem orientated policing. Often, the people that live in the community are able to identify where the problem spots are at or even what problems are more prevalent to creating crime in an area because they live in the area. A partnership between the police and the community is created in community orientated policing, and this can lead to improving problem-oriented policing in that the community can be involved in, as well. A police department does not have to be a separate entity from the community it serves and vice versa. Problem orientated policing may seem something that is only something that a police officer is responsible for…