A Note On Harvard Referencing

Submitted By Amir-Machmlgi
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Pages: 24

Harvard
Referencing

Harvard Referencing

SMILE is Available online via Moodle at http://moodle.yorksj.ac.uk
This publication can be accessed as either a print copy or as an ebook (epub format) SMILE is a Creative Commons resource created as part of the JISC
ReProduce programme.
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Harvard Referencing
Contents
Goals 
What is referencing? 
Why do it? 
Citing 
Citing in the body of the text 
Quoting in the text 
Citing from an interview or personal communication 
Citing from chapters written by different authors 
Secondary Referencing 
Citing and quoting from multi-media and online resources 
Electronic journal (e-journals) articles 
Web pages 
CD-ROMs 
Multimedia 
Reference list & bibliography 
Layout for your reference list & bibliography 
Blogs 
Books 
Chapters in anthologies and edited books 
Translated books 
Books written in a foreign language 
E-books 
Conference proceedings 
Emails 
Journal articles 
E-journals 
Images 
Interviews 
Maps 
Multimedia (inc. audio clips, films, cassettes, etc.) 
Music 
Newspaper articles 
Patents 
Performances (live/published) 
Personal communication with a professional practitioner 
Podcasts 
Presentations/lectures 
Reports 
Standards 
Statutory instruments 
Theses 
Web pages 
White and green papers 
Miscellaneous 
Frequently asked questions 
Congratulations! 
References 

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Harvard Referencing
Goals

This booklet is designed to help you understand how to be able to cite and reference your information appropriately using the Harvard system of referencing.

What is referencing?

Referencing is a way of acknowledging that you have used the ideas and written material belonging to another author. It demonstrates that you have undertaken an appropriate literature search and carried out appropriate reading.
The following are examples of sources you might access and need to reference:













Books
Journal articles
Eletronic journal articles
World Wide Web
E-mails
Video, films, CD-ROMs & audio tape recordings
Newspapers
Conference papers
Pamphlets
Radio/TV broadcasts ( you must check with your lecturer that this type of material is okay to use in your assignment!)
Personal communication
Interviews (If this is a personal interview, you must always ask permission of the interviewee before using such material)

Why do it?






Anyone reading your assignments should be able to trace the sources you have used in the development of your work.
If you do not acknowledge another writer’s work or ideas, you could be accused of plagiarism.
Accurate referencing is commensurate with good academic practice and enhances the presentation of your work.
Accurate referencing can improve your marks!

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Harvard Referencing
Citing

When you have used an idea from a book, journal article or other source, you must acknowledge this in your text. We refer to this as ‘citing’.
When you cite someone else’s work, you must always state the author or editor and the date of publication.
If the work has two authors or editors you must cite both names when citing in the body of your own work.
Only use the author and date; do not include the title, place of publication, and other information, because these full details of the item are written in your reference list at the end of your essay.

Citing in the body of the text

When you cite a piece of work you must always state the author / editor and the date of publication. If the work has two authors / editors you must cite both names. When citing in-text, you only use the author and date; do not include the title, place of publication etc. as these further details are written in your reference list at the end of your assignment.…