Antisocial Behavior Disorder Essay

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Joel Rodriguez
April 4th 2014

Antisocial Personality Disorder

Psychology
Mr.D

301.7
Antisocial Personality Disorder (APD) is typically defined as a disregard for rights, feelings, or happiness of other people. Contrary to popular belief, it is not the avoidance of social activities or extreme introversion, but the violation of social norms. The Diagnostic and
Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders IV (DSM­IV) states that symptoms of APD are closely related to symptoms of psychopathy, sociopathy, or dyssocial personality disorder. The history, criterion and treatment of Antisocial Personality Disorder will be further researched.
Cases of APD have been documented since the dawn of the 19th century and have been related to criminal cases and civil liberties since then. Clinical doctors of the time have tried to find the etiology of APD but found no results or behaviors similar to existing psychological disorders, so instead it was termed “Moral Insanity” due to its insanity related nature. Moral
Insanity was defined as an unimpairment of the intellectual facilities but an apparent impairment of moral principles, and the diagnosis found acceptance in the courts of Europe and America.
Soon the diagnosis was further researched and renamed “Psychopathic Inferiority” and was accepted for another century. During the 1940s research made further breakthroughs in the study of the disorder and Henderson defined psychopathic states, allowing for Psychopathic Inferiority to be defined as a conformity to intellectual standards but exhibit conduct disorders in social settings. Courts found the growing need for treatment and magnitude scales to be created and put psychologists to the task to avoid wrongful detention in the courts. Soon the DSM adopted it as a widely and legally recognized condition and continued to exist within the DSM since.

Joel Rodriguez
April 4th 2014

Antisocial Personality Disorder

Psychology
Mr.D

The DSM states that APD is usually accompanied by behaviors that seem callous, or cold towards the rights and feelings of others. Arrogance is a dominant feature in individuals with
APD, self appraisal being a form which arrogance is displayed. In social settings, these individuals have what is called a “Glib”, a superficial charm which lures others in. Studies show that the etiology of APD is commonly rooted in disturbing events occurring in early childhood, setting off behaviors throughout childhood such as violence towards other children and animals, school truancy, violent relationships, lack of responsibility and malnutrition. Children with APD often complain of boredom in social settings, depression, somatization disorders, gambling, and lack of impulse control. Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) has often been linked to children with APD and is sometimes used as a predictor for children who may develop APD later in life. APD cannot be diagnosed in people before 18 years of age but symptoms are seen in children. APD is far more common in males than females, and as a population is exist in 3% of males and 1% of females. Criterion to diagnose in the DSM IV include “A pervasive pattern of disregard for and violation of the rights of others occurring since age 15 years, such as failure to conform to social norms or lawful behaviors, deceitfulness, lying for personal gain, impulsivity, irritability accompanied by aggressive physical behaviors, disregard for safety, and a lack of remorse. Individuals must be over 18 but must have evidence of the disorder before 15 years old and antisocial behaviors cannot be exclusively during Schizophrenic or Manic episodes.

Joel Rodriguez
April 4th 2014

Antisocial Personality Disorder

Psychology
Mr.D

Many…