Behaviour and Idividual Differences Essays

Submitted By IramMalik1
Words: 2073
Pages: 9

Behaviour and Individual Differences.

Contents.
1.0Introduction…………………………………………………………………….1
2.0Methods of identification and Assessment…………………………………2
2.1Summative……………………………………………………………………..2
2.2Diagnostic……………………………………………………………………...2
2.3Formative……………………………………………………………………….3
3.0Practical Strategies……………………………………………………………3
3.1Social and Communication skills……………………………………….3, 4, 5
3.2Routine organisation………………………………………………………..5, 6
3.3Peers……………………………………………………………………………6
4.0Conclusion …………………………………………………………………..6, 7
4.1Recommendations……………………………………………………………..7
5.0References…………………………………………………………………. 8, 9

1.0Introduction.
This report analyses a case history of Fozia aged 7 who has individual needs. The main concerns of Fozia are her communication and social skills and any change in the routine which she does not like. The report examines different methods of identification and assessment such as ongoing observations which could be employed and considers which would be more appropriate for her. Relevant theoretical perspectives/models will be considered and practical strategies will be related to this that could be implemented.

2.0Methods of Identification and Assessment.
Jacques (2000) claims that assessments can be done through various ways but in the end they will all have information collected for judgements to be made.

2.1 Formative assessment. Jacques (2000) states assessments which help with planning for the learning that takes place on a daily basis are those known to be formative assessments. The different ways in which formative assessments can be carried out are doing observations, talking to the child or some written feedback. Torrance (1995) explains formative assessment is an approach where the teacher may look forward to as they are developing and improving strategies to help children. Formative assessments do not only highlight what children are learning or what they have learned but it will also give an idea of what the children can learn in the immediate future.

2.2 Diagnostic assessment.
Torrance (1995) explains how diagnostic assessments are used when identifying a problem. This type of assessment would mostly be common in the special educational needs field. Tests can be used in diagnostic assessments but this can put a negative impact on the child’s learning as the child may feel that they are being isolated from the rest of their peers and have to do certain activities. A SENCO would usually carry out observations on children’s at school if a teacher has mentioned any concerns about the child. The SEN Code of Practice (2001) states that schools should make clear assessments on the children as when referring them it is vital to look over any progress that would have been made over time.
2.3 Summative assessment.
Torrance (1995) explains that continuous assessment done by teachers can be summed up at the end of key stages to give collective information. Sometimes the information may not be reliable as the key stage assessments are not used alone. Examples of work may be kept along with observations. During key stage 1 children take their SATs (standard assessment task). The SATs give children and overall level of achievement. But it has always been argued that SATs do not work well as they are not to often and are not integrated into the children’s needs. Also very importantly they may not specifically meet individual targets of children. SATs are not so very detailed as well to provide a collection of information.

3.0 Practical Strategies.
Identifying the stages Fozia is currently working at is a very crucial aspect for her teacher. Therefore it is vital to assess and identify her needs so that they can be worked on to help her reach to the stage of her norms. Kershaw (2004) suggests that it is also important that the teacher him/herself has had sufficient training or is aware of using appropriate resources in…