Com Final Essays

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Pages: 5

Tanner Fiser
Com 105-A
Mrs. Richardson
5/7/15
Three Models of Communication

Communication as action, interaction, and transaction are the three models of communication. Each model is important for communication to work efficiently, but some models are more important than others. Communication as an action is simply the act of a sender sending a message to the receiver. For example, this is like sending one a voicemail, email, or a message in a bottle. Even if you send someone a message and they do not receive it, communication of action technically still has occurred. Communication as interaction counts only if there is an exchange of information between two individuals. If Luke sends Emily a message and then Emily responds to the message therefore communication as interaction has taken place. Communication as a transaction is a shared or understanding meaning between two individuals. This is the realization that two individuals understand and need each other. Also, this can result in communication as transaction if an exchange of messages results in a deal, agreement, or contract. Each of these models are different in many ways. Although communication as action stands out more than the other two, transaction and interaction still difference in many ways. Just because two share information, such as interaction, does not mean that they understand and agree with each other. This is why interaction and transaction differ incredibly. Although, communication as action differs tremendously from the other two it still has a very important role. This is because communication as the action is the starting point for communication as interaction and transaction. Therefore, even though communication as a transaction is clearly the most important due to the fact of agreement and understanding the other two models of communication are very important.

Tanner Fiser
Professor Richardson
Com-105-A
5/8/15
Self-Concept.
Self-Concept is your interior identity or subjective description of who you think you are. Image looking at yourself from a peer's point of view, this is what self-concept is. Some people build up their self-concept seeing themselves differently than others truly see them. There are four basic means through how we develop our self-concept. The first being communication with others. We simply do not learn about ourselves when alone. How do you know if you are funny, mean, or obnoxious without any feedback? We learn about ourselves through others, and their feedback. This is a huge part to whom we believe and see ourselves to be. Secondly, we develop our self-concept through groups we are associated with. Some groups we are born into, others we choose. Either way, we find our identity through groups we associate with. High school, for example, if you hang out with the jocks you are going to see yourself as a "jock". Same with jobs in the real world, if you work at a big time company you will most likely see yourself as successful. Assumed Roles, or "who am I?" Many people find their self-concept due to the roles or situations they are in, such as jobs. Many people are labeled by teacher, janitor, salesman, and many other titles. When born into the world we already find a part of our self-concept due to sex, and the difference people see in a man and woman such as power and vulnerability. Lastly, self-labels is a part of self-concept. You relate self-concept to the actions you do or the decisions you make. Although our self-concept is affected by others, we still see ourselves through our own actions. Finding your self-concept is truly important, and making sure it is truly who you are is more important.

Tanner Fiser
Professor Richardson
Com-105-A
05/19/15
Nonverbal Codes. Nonverbal codes are extremely important in communication. Nonverbal codes are gestures sent from one person to another without any verbal communication. Being able to understand someone…