Essay about community enagament

Submitted By jello80
Words: 4242
Pages: 17

Leading Community Engagement

Table of Contents: Page:

Introduction and Overview……….……………………………..............................3
The Issues….………………………………………………………………………....6
Strategies…………………………………………………………………………......9
Briefing Paper…………………………………………………………………….....14
Conclusion……………………………...……………..………………………….….14
References………………………………………………………………………......15

Introduction:

In recent years Australia’s lowest-performing schools have become a focal point of scrutiny and concern. Policymakers have called for swift and dramatic action to improve Australia’s lowest-performing schools. There has been debate regarding the magnitude of their dysfunction, leading to requirements for swift action.
Specific strategies for “turning around” chronically low-performing schools have become imminent with, The Department of Education implementing policies to promote school improvement models that include fundamental, comprehensive changes in leadership, staffing, and governance.

Jensen (2013) suggests incremental change is not enough for the worst schools. They require comprehensive overhauls that target numerous aspects of failure.
Supported by Federal Government grants and incentive programs states are attempting to catalyse rapid improvement in the lowest-performing schools through efforts that range from: Replacing Principals, to replacing the entire staff, to closing schools entirely. Housman (2001) states poorly performing schools often end up with a multitude of programmes and funding streams to improve performance, without any coherent vision of how these resources will make a difference.

School turnaround efforts require highly effective leaders able to create the conditions for rapid and sustained change. Rather than changing one or two characteristics of the school, successful school turnarounds look at simultaneously improving leadership, expectations, teaching and learning strategies and cultures, school culture and relationships with the wider community. Jensen (2013).

To successfully impact student outcomes leaders in ‘turnaround contexts’ must, drive a fundamental shift in school culture and instructional practice that results in early gains and ongoing high performance. The demands are great, but the need to improve opportunities for our children in failing schools is even greater.

School turnarounds are possible, but they take a concerted effort, effective forward thinking leadership at the helm and persistent, achievement-oriented collaboration among staff. Fullan (2008) suggests that purposeful peer interaction within the school is crucial. Student learning and achievement increase substantially when teachers work in learning communities supported by school leaders who focus on improvement. For turnaround efforts to succeed nothing is more important than making sure that the leaders and teachers who are selected for these challenging roles have the knowledge, dedication and tenacity to make a turnaround happen. In order for underperforming schools to stay alive in the community they need to make a 180 degree turn for improvement.

Overview:

Downside Catholic Primary School.

Downside Catholic Primary School is located in an aging quiet seaside town. Downside is situated in a low socio economic area of Western Australia, with most families struggling financially.
The ‘normal’ family is made up of a single parent, usually a mother and her children. Downside is a triple stream school, which is not currently running at full capacity. The school currently has an enrolment of 268 students. Families are leaving in droves, and an Exit Surveys suggest its because a brand new school called Stellar College has recently opened with 21st century innovative technology, This new school offers Arts and Music Programs, it strives for academic success and has an amazing reputation within the community. Downside is unable to…