Essay on Crucible Project

Submitted By TreyBailey69
Words: 480
Pages: 2












Highlights:
February 19th, 1942, two months after the Pearl Harbor bombings, President Roosevelt signed executive order 9066 to have all American citizens of Japanese ancestry put into camps scattered in the West of the country.
Ten camps were created across the county
Representatives from the camps were chosen to report their hardships, but the government didn’t listen.
They were put into these camps because the government suspected they were spies for the Japanese, who were the enemy.
During the entire war only 10 were convicted of spying for Japan and they were all
Caucasian.
After a number of years those in the camps were allowed to leave, but oftentimes when they returned home, their houses were sold and their belongings were gone.
December 1944 public proclamation number 21, which became effective in January 1945 allowed all the Japanese to return to their home.
Several years after the camps were dissolved, descendants of those put into the settlements were rewarded $20,000.
Estimated property loss was estimated at between $810 million & $2 billion dollars Connections:

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It didn’t matter if they weren’t spies, and it didn’t matter if they denied being spies, they were condemned simply because the government felt the need to imprison them. In The
Crucible, innocent people who were accused of witchcraft were not seen as guiltless in the court because the government/judges would not listen to their pleas­ Being accused of something that they could not prove.
Upstanding members of society (War veterans) of Japanese descent were even forced to go into the internment camps, much like in The Crucible when Proctor, who is seen by most of the people as a strong and respectable man, was accused of witchcraft.
In The Crucible, those who were condemned for witchcraft, though they were innocent, had their property auctioned off. Citizens in internment camps also faced the same issue­when they were forced to leave their homes and then allowed to return, the places they had bought and the things they had owned were not theirs anymore.
People were chosen to represent the camps to the…