Disaster Recovery Response to Hurricane Katrina Essay

Submitted By perined25
Words: 497
Pages: 2

DeVante Perine
April 1, 2014
Emergency Management
Paper 2
First Response
The disaster recovery response to Hurricane Katrina included federal government agencies such as the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), state and local-level agencies, federal and National Guard soldiers, non-governmental organizations, charities, and private individuals(Thomas 14). Tens of thousands of volunteers and troops responded or were deployed to the disaster - most in the affected area but also throughout the U.S. at shelters set up in at least 19 states.
Where is New Orleans at Now In the Recovery Process
The efforts to recovery in New Orleans have been slow according to an article I read. The data support some narratives about the recovery after Hurricane Katrina and challenge others. Everyone has a different view on the progression of the process. For instance, while it’s true that New Orleans has experienced some of the greatest growth in the country in recent years, according to some experts that growth is slowing(Thomas 14).
Population Due to Migration?
“At the current rate of migration, it would take New Orleans 20 years to return to its pre-Katrina population — 15 if you factor in the birth rate(Thomas 14).” The most recent figures show that growth in New Orleans is masking a population loss in the rest of the state. The most recent year for which data is available shows that the state lost population for the second straight year. That loss is outweighed by the number of international immigrants. resulting in a net migration(Thomas 14). A total of 236,970 people left Louisiana between July 2005 and June 2006(Thomas 14) due to Hurricane Katrina. Every year since Katrina, the state has gained more residents than it has lost. But with the exception of 2009, each year the increase has been smaller than the year before().
“The most recent data, for 2012-13, showed that 4,203 more people moved into the state than out of it. At that rate, it will take…