Education in the Times: An Analysis of Appropriated Money Woes in 1892 Essays

Submitted By kateferg
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Education in the Times: An Analysis of Appropriated Money Woes in 1892 Education has served as a major theme in American life since the founding of this great nation. It has served as a vital building block for success and prosperity and has lead to a nation of some of the greatest masterminds of the arts, sciences, and technology. Education was set up as a national priority by our forefathers. Written into many major and binding documents are guidelines for education and educational reform has plagued many decades as each generation strives to better the system for those who will come after them. ON January 6, 1892 the New York Times published a pieces on the appropriation of funds for libraries in public education institutions. libraries, a vital part of the learning process, were on of the first public entities. A system of borrowing books was a novel and vital part of early American life and were quickly and easily integrated into the American system of education. (insert closing sentence) The 1892 New York Times article, titled, Public School Libraries- Effort to be Made to have the Funds Property Expended, details the problem in education with the appropriation of money to institutions for the purpose of advancing their technology, expanding their repertoire and bettering facilities, however the division of the money has been illy split in previous years, leading to poor use of the funds. District heads in the state of New York have repeatedly said that funds appropriated for the use in advancing libraries are often used for other purposes such as teacher wages and school expenses. The difference is large, citing over a million dollars appropriated towards libraries but used for other purposes. The goals of libraries has always remained the same, to educate to masses and provide and inexpensive way for them to gain knowledge. The article goes on to elaborate between the relationship between public schools and libraries and the precedent set by New York State when the two were joined. In every public New York State school and a library can be found accompanying each school. The state of New York appropriates somewhere between 50 and 55 thousand dollars to this fundamental cause each year and the poor appropriation of these funds reflects poorly on the schools as well as the legislature for not paying closer attention to the use of the funds and appropriating appropriately. Education has served as a cornerstone for the people of the United States since its inception. Benjamin Franklin and many of the other national innovators felt it was a vital part of our nation and the emphasis they put on education helped make The United States a leader in the education of its youth. Reformation has served as a major theme of this course of history. People throughout history have translated the feelings they have regarding issues pertaining education into action because there has always been a major emphasis on education. The New York Times addresses a point which is often seen in early and somewhat unproductive governments. The examples stems from a major issues with monitoring of government funds. The intent is there but the ability to monitor and control is lacking and unlike many causes which go without being noticed, public funds for the sake of education generally do not. This example can been seen in other cases, for instance back peddling for government funds to attain construction bids, improper use of funds for personal gains, all familiar scenarios seen throughout history which serve as major barriers to productivity. The New York Times served as one of America’s foremost newspapers. It was always greeted with the task of presenting on the most notable news of the times and represents a cultural need for pertinent information. While this article on appropriations of state money may seem small in the larger scheme of world news it does relate to the history course in many way. It is often the small things…