Essay Outline

Submitted By Emilymather71
Words: 576
Pages: 3

Essay Outline

Thesis statement: Macbeth is clearly a tragic hero, in that he has noble characteristics but struggles in a fatal flaw, his distorted perception of real life, and he’s responsible for his downfall.

Topic sentences:

From the moment the witches told Macbeth that he is going to become king he struggled with one fatal flaw- ambition.
His ambition was to become king and for no one to take his throne from him.
He did anything he could to become king, it didn’t matter to him what he had to do to get it.
He killed Duncan.
Killed Banquo to keep throne.
Killed Macduff’s family for revenge.
He didn’t care what he had to do to get what he thought he deserved.

Macbeth does not seem to know what real life is, he is constantly mixing reality with fantasy.
He believes becoming king is everything, but it is not.
He kills anyone he has to but that’s not real life.
The witches, he thinks the prophecies will come true, but he makes them come true.

From the decisions that Macbeth chose throughout this play it caused him to downfall in his life.
He decided to kill Duncan: put a target on his back, hallucinations
Killed Banquo: gave himself away at party
He believed the witches
Let his paranoia get the better of him

Conclusion:

Emily Mather
English 112
Mrs. MacDonald
November 17th, 2014 title A tragic hero is defined as a character that has a flaw. This flaw sets off a series of events that lead to the downfall or utter ruin of the tragic hero. In the Shakespearean tragedy Macbeth, he is clearly a tragic hero, in that he has noble characteristics but struggles in a fatal flaw, his distorted perception of real life, and he’s responsible for his downfall. In light of this it will be argued that Macbeth is a tragic hero. From the moment Macbeth is told that he will become the king of Scotland he struggles in one fatal flaw- ambition. Ambition is a strong desire to do or to achieve something, typically requiring determination and hard work. Ambition is defined as “an intense drive for success or power; a desire to achieve honor, wealth or fame.” This is something Macbeth certainly has throughout the whole play, but we first…