Film technique effect table Essay

Submitted By Cole-Betty
Words: 754
Pages: 4

Mise-en-scene (everything we see in the frame)
Technique
Definition/Finding example
Effect
Characterisation
The creation and depiction of characters. Other film techniques used to depict characters:
Dialogue (accents) Music
Props Costume
Behaviour and movements (acting style)
Sets they are placed in
Positioning in frame/Camera shots
What other characters say about them (also dialogue)

This depends on the use of technique. Use of any of these techniques might represent the status of the character and reflect, their emotions and personality and any conflicts they might experience in the text.

Cinematography (the ‘language’ of film)
Technique
Definition
Effect
Camera shots
Long shot (LS)
Shot that shows some of the landscape or surrounding environment and contains the whole height of any figure in the frame
Focuses on the character’s relationship with setting, largely contributes to characterisation.

Medium shot (MS)
Less background, figures in frame are seen from the waist up

Reveals character relationships, contributing to characterisation
Close up (CU)
Contains almost no background, but focuses on the whole of an object or on a person from just below the shoulders, with space left above the head.

Directs audience to extreme detail required to make an understanding of the scene. Shows character’s reactions, largely contributing to theme and characterisation.
Over the shoulder shot
Includes part of the character (usually the shoulder and back of head) whose view we are sharing

Encourages the audience to see the events through the character’s point of view. Creates intimacy between audience and character.
Point of view shot (POV)
Seen from the character’s point of view

Encourages the audience to see the events through the character’s point of view. Creates intimacy between audience and character.
Camera angles (the ‘language’ of film)
Overshot or overhead shot
Taken when the camera is directly overhead or above the scene, object or person

High-angle shot
Taken when the camera is above and looking down on the scene, objects or person, but is not directly overhead.
Used to make the character look small and also indicate that the character is weak or inferior. (characterisation)
Eye-level shot
Taken when the camera is level with the object or person.
Suggests reality, impacts audience involvement with the event and the character (characterisation and theme)
Low-angle shot
Taken when the camera is below or looking up at the object or person.
Used to make the character look big and indicates the character is powerful and dominant. (characterisation)
Camera movement (the ‘language’ of films)
Tracking
The camera is mounted on a moving platform or dolly and moves with the subject into the action. e.g. someone cycling or driving
The camera could move parallel to or at an angle to the subject. Can be coupled with music to create a sense of atmosphere, or could be an establishing shot.
Panning
The camera swings from side to side (horizontally) or up and own (vertically).

Pans and dolly shots are often used in conjunction with…