Hamlet or Agamemnon: Which Play is More Tragic? Essay examples

Submitted By jordan-shihabi
Words: 602
Pages: 3

Upon conclusion of my analysis of both Agamemnon and Hamlet it is evident that Hamlet is more tragic then Agamemnon. Howrever, they both are tragedies in their own right as they both a bid by Aristotle's definition of a tragedy. Both plays display the collapse of a character who is not entirely good nor a entirely evil, but a combination of the two. This character, the tragic hero, also undergoes a tragic flaw, which ultimately leads to their death. The development of this character causes the audience to feel pity, fear and remorse towards them. Also, both plays have all elements that signify a Greek tragedy: anagnorisis, hubris, harmartia, catharsis and peripatetic. However, through my observation, Hamlet was a more tragic play then Agamemnon considering that the tragic hero in Hamlet, made more appearances on stage which allowed for substantially more attachment to his character from the audience then Agamemnon. Hamlet has multiple soliloquies that contribute to the development of his character, allowing the audience to understand what he is experiencing directly from the tragic hero himself. An example of one of these soliloquies is arguably recognized as one of the most important and famous soliloquies from the play when Hamlet states

To be, or not to be: that is the question:
Whether 'tis nobler in the mind to suffer
The slings and arrows of outrageous fortune,
Or to take arms against a sea of troubles,
And by opposing end them? To die: to sleep;
No more; and by a sleep to say we end
The heart-ache and the thousand natural shocks (70)
That flesh is heir to, 'tis a consummation
Devoutly to be wish'd. To die, to sleep;
To sleep: perchance to dream: ay, there's the rub;
For in that sleep of death what dreams may come
When we have shuffled off this mortal coil,
Must give us pause: there's the respect
That makes calamity of so long life;
For who would bear the whips and scorns of time,
The oppressor's wrong, the proud man's contumely,
The pangs of despis'd love, the law's delay, (80)
The insolence of office and the spurns

With these insightful To be, or not to be: that is the question:
Whether 'tis nobler in the mind to suffer
The slings and arrows of outrageous fortune,
Or…