Health Disperities Study guide Essay

Submitted By atab93
Words: 2971
Pages: 12

THE HIGHLIGHTED PARTS ARE THINGS WE STILL NEED TO FILL OUT

General Test Tips
· Read carefully and completely
· Take note of “not” phrases or all inclusive/exclusive phrases Week 1 – Introduction and One Health
What are our 3 frameworks for this class? What do they mean? Could you explain them to colleagues?
1. Life Course Perspective- Is the concept of evaluating everything that a human being has been exposed to in the past when determining a proper route of intervention. This perspective goes beyond the ecological perspective when assessing the health status or the decision making process of an individual
2. Evolutionary Biology and Health- This framework describes how humans moved from a primarily gathering/ hunting society to a primarily farming/herding way of life.
3. One Health- Is the idea that ill health in either a human, animal or ecosystem will affect all three categories. Human Health, Animal Health and Environment are all linked. -
We can call them LEO to remember them easily.

What are “health disparities?” Health disparities refer to differences between groups of people. These differences can affect how frequently a disease affects a group, how many people get sick, or how often the disease causes death. -

From PP --Do we all equally share benefits and burdens of society equally? -
Who is affected? In most cases, health disparities affect minorities, people with low socioeconomic status, and communities with low social capital. -
Many different populations are affected by disparities. These include:
Racial and ethnic minorities
Residents of rural areas
Women, children, the elderly
Persons with disabilities

What messages did we get from Dr. Hans Rosling and his datasets?
Uses his data bubble software to burst myths about the developing world. He pointed out that countries with low SES and poor health are still struggling with infectious diseases. - Looks for new analysis on china.
Global trends in health and economics

What do we know about the global burden of diseases?
Not distributed evenly however the countries with low SES aren’t necessary the ones with the worst health.
.

How have diseases changed over time (infectious vs chronic)?
A consistent trend has been observed as the leading causes of death moved from infectious to non-communicable diseases (chronic/lifestyle diseases).

Professor Peacock said to also know the Ten Great Public Health Achievements -- United States, 1900-1999
1. Vaccination
2. Motor-vehicle safety
3. Safer workplaces
4. Control of infectious diseases
5. Decline in deaths from coronary heart disease and stroke
6. Safer and healthier foods
7. Healthier mothers and babies
8. Family planning
9. Fluoridation of drinking water
10. Recognition of Tobacco use as a health hazard
Val Made Safe Cookies During Storms Having Family Fun Time Week 2 – Epidemiology, Life Course Perspective and Evolutionary Biology
What is meant by the Life Course Perspective?
Is the concept of evaluating everything that a human being has been exposed to in the past when determining a proper route of intervention. This perspective goes beyond the ecological perspective when assessing the health status or the decision making process of an individual. -Steph
What is meant when one is looking through a lens of evolutionary biology? ARE THE SLIDES FOR WEEK 2 LOADING FOR ANYONE?? im trying to see if i can find the answer to these questions
The 3 basic assumptions of Darwinian/Evolutionary evolution?
1. Phenotype variation
2. Phenotypic variation as a result of genotype variation
3. offspring must survive and reproduce

What are “adaptation” and “natural selection”?
Adaptation refers to both the current state of being adapted and to the dynamic evolutionary process that leads to the adaptation. natural selection refers to the survival of the fittest
1. What is “life history theory” and how is it relevant to health?…