HIS145 Syllabus 10 12 Essay

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Syllabus­ HIS145 Version 4

College of Humanities
Syllabus
HIS/145
The American Experience Since 1945
College of Humanities
Course Start Date
10/08/2012
Course End Date
Group Number
Meeting Times
Workshop Dates
Learning Center

11/05/2012
YUEL12-1
6-10PM
10/08/12, 10/15, 10/22, 10/29, 11/05/2012
Yuma Learning Center
899 East Plaza Circle,
Yuma, Arizona - 85365
Phone:
928.341.0233

FACILITATOR INFORMATION
NAME:
George Thomson gthomson@email.uophx.edu
(University of Phoenix) teachweborg@gmail.com (Personal)

520-313-5873 (Arizona)
FACILITATOR AVAILABILITY
24/7 Leave a message or text me

Assignment Summary
ASSIGNMENTS
I ndividual (70%)
Weekly In-Class Participation

Due DATE

Points

Points Earned

All Weeks

10

All Weeks

8

Wk1
Wk1

5
2

Civil Rights Diary

WK2

5

Modern America Matrix:
1960s

WK2

2

WK3

5

WK3

3

Weekly In-Class DQs
Cold War and Communism
Modern America Matrix: 1950s

Social Movements and Trends
Modern America Matrix:
1970s

1

Syllabus­ HIS145 Version 4

Modern America Matrix: 1980s

WK4

3

Interview

WK4

7

Modern America Matrix:
1990s to Present

WK5

3

Terrorism

WK5

8

All weeks

10

America and the World
Presentation: Vietnam War

WK2

4

America and the World
Presentation: Nixon’s Détente and End of Vietnam War

Wk3

4

America and the World
Presentation: The 1980s

WK4

4

We didn't start the fire presentation Wk 5

5

America and the World
Presentation: 1990s to
Present

WK5

5

Complete SEOCS
Learning Team (30%)
Weekly LT activity points

Total

100

C ourse Description
This course is an overview of the principal social, political, economic, and global events which have shaped the
American experience since World War II. Understanding modern American history is a necessity in today's ever-changing world. This course aims to supply the tools for understanding current political, social, cultural, and economic problems in the U.S. by applying a historical perspective to analyze contemporary issues.
Policies
Faculty and students will be held responsible for understanding and adhering to all policies contained within the following two documents:
● University policies
: You must be logged into the student website to view this document.
● Instructor policies: This document is posted in the
Course Materials forum. University policies are subject to change. Be sure to read the policies at the beginning of each class. Policies may be slightly different depending on the modality in which you attend class. If you have recently changed modalities, read the policies governing your current class modality.
Course Materials

2

Syllabus­ HIS145 Version 4

Brinkley, A. (2012).
American history: Connecting with the past
(14th ed.). New York, NY: McGraw-Hill.
All electronic materials are available on the student website.

Week One: Postwar Society and Culture: 1945–1960

Details
Objectives

1.1
Explain American Cold War policies and practices in the late
1940s and 1950s.
1.2
Identify the relationship between the military events and outcomes of the Korean War.
1.3
Evaluate popular culture and consumerism during the
Eisenhower years.

For OPTIONAL
Fun

Take this e-test online and submit by Week 3
The 1960’s

Reading

Read
Ch. 27 of
American History
.

Reading

Read
Ch. 28 of
American History
.

Reading

Read the following articles from this week’s Electronic Reserve
Readings:

Due

Points

·
Milam, M. C. (2010). Hiroshima and Nagasaki.
Humanist
,
70(4), 32-35.
·
Bernstein, B. J. (2002). Containment.
Encyclopedia of
American Foreign Policy
, 1(Edition 2), 345-364.
·
Merrill, D. (2006). The Truman Doctrine: Containing communism and modernity.
Presidential Studies Quarterly
,
36(1), 27-37.
·
1940s war, Cold War and consumerism. (2005).
Advertising Age,
76(13), 38-40.
·
Pollard, C. (2006). Her kind: Anne Sexton, the Cold War and the idea of the housewife. Critical Quarterly, 48(3), 1-24.
Participation

Participate in class discussion.

2

Discussion
Questions…