History: Nutrition and Performance Essay

Submitted By xdavidn
Words: 3138
Pages: 13

“TAKING IT TO THE MAT”

THE WRESTLER'S GUIDE
TO OPTIMAL PERFORMANCE

Prepared for the NCAA by The Center for Nutrition in Sport and Human Performance

University of Massachusetts
Amherst, MA

TAKING IT TO THE MAT:
THE WRESTLERS GUIDE TO OPTIMAL PERFORMANCE

Page I. INTRODUCTION 3

II. ENDING DANGEROUS WEIGHT-CUTTING: THE NEW RULES 3

III. MAKING WEIGHT 4

A. WEIGHING THE OPTIONS: Determining Your Weight Class 4

B. A DELICATE BALANCE: Cutting and Maintaining Weight 6
Avoiding Unhealthy Weight-Cutting Practices 7

IV. ENERGIZING YOUR PERFORMANCE 8

A. FUELING UP: Using the Principles of Sports Nutrition 8 B. YE OLDE WATERING HOLE: Achieving Adequate Hydration 10 C. FACT OR FICTION: Being Smart about Vitamins, Minerals, and Other Supplements 11 D. BEFORE THE WHISTLE BLOWS: Preparing for Training 12
Eating For Competition 14 E. ROAD WARRIORS: Eating on the Road 15 V. QUICK TIPS 16

A. HIGH PERFORMANCE MEALS AND SNACKS 16

B. HIGH PERFORMANCE TIPS 17

I. INTRODUCTION

Wrestling is a great sport with a long history dating back to prehistoric times. Cave drawings found in France depict wrestlers in various holds and leverage positions. Wrestling became part of the Olympic Games in Greece in about 708B.C.

Wrestling is one of the few sports where men of all sizes can compete. The sport requires strength, concentration, coordination, skill, agility, and muscular endurance. Wrestlers often seek to improve their performance by using the many supplements available on the market or working-out in hot rooms. However, the scientifically proven way to achieve the most out of your practice is to workout in a moderate to cool room. The sure way to energize your performance and competition is with the right eating plan over the entire season!

This booklet provides information on how to determine the appropriate body weight for you, why heat and dehydration work against you, and tips on how to achieve the optimal diet to unleash a championship performance!

II. ENDING DANGEROUS WEIGHT-CUTTING: THE NEW RULES

In the fall of 1997, three collegiate wrestlers died in their quest to make weight for competition. The NCAA Committee on Competitive Safeguard and Medical Aspects of Sport, along with the NCAA Wrestling Rules Committee, worked together to develop new rules to ensure the health and safety of athletes. These rules will be monitored by the NCAA, so you should be familiar with them:

· Artificial weight loss practices such as the use of laxatives, emetics, steam rooms, and hot practice rooms are banned.

· Weight classes will be established at the beginning of the season by a physician or athletic trainer. Athletes can modify their weight over 8 weeks of the season but cannot lose more than 1.5% of body weight per week. Also, athletes cannot fall below their established minimum body weight.

· For dual meets, weigh-ins will be 1 hour before the start of the first match. For tournaments, weigh-ins will be 2 hours before the start of the first match on the first day and 1 hour before the first match on subsequent days.

· All wrestling coaches must be required to be certified annually in cardio-pulmonary resuscitation and first aid.

· The new weight classes are: 125, 133, 141,149, 157, 165, 174,184, 197, and 285 pounds.

III. MAKING WEIGHT

A. WEIGHING THE OPTIONS: Determining Your Weight Class
Competitive equity in wrestling requires that similar sized individuals compete against one another. Many wrestlers feel that they need to lose that extra body fat to cut down to a…