Obesity And Socioeconomic Status In Adults: United States

Submitted By Alrashdi1993
Words: 2208
Pages: 9

NCHS Data Brief ■ No. 50 ■ December 2010

Obesity and Socioeconomic Status in Adults: United States, 2005–2008 cynthia l. ogden, ph.d.; molly m. lamb, ph.d.; margaret d. carroll, m.s.p.h.; and Katherine m. flegal, ph.d.

Key findings:
Data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2005– 2008

• Among men, obesity prevalence is generally similar at all income levels, however, among non-Hispanic black and Mexican-American men those with higher income are more likely to be obese than those with low income. • Higher income women are less likely to be obese than low income women, but most obese women are not low income. • There is no significant trend between obesity and education among men. Among women, however, there is a trend, those with college degrees are less likely to be obese compared with less educated women. • Between 1988–1994 and 2007–2008 the prevalence of obesity increased in adults at all income and education levels.

In 2007–2008 more than one-third of United States adults were obese (1). Obese individuals are at increased risk of diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease, hypertension, and certain cancers, among other conditions (2). Some studies have shown a relationship between obesity prevalence and socioeconomic status measured as educational level or income (3,4). This data brief presents the most recent national data on obesity in United States adults and its association with poverty income ratio (PIR) and education level. Results are presented by sex and race and ethnicity. Keywords: adults • obesity • income • education

Among men, obesity prevalence is generally similar at all income levels, with a tendency to be slightly higher at higher income levels.

u.s. department of health and human services centers for disease control and prevention national center for health statistics

NCHS Data Brief ■ No. 50 ■ December 2010
Overall, almost 33% of men who live in households with income at or above 350% of the poverty level are obese, while 29.2% of men who live below 130% of the poverty level are obese (Figure 1). The relationship between obesity and income in men varies by race and ethnicity. Among non-Hispanic black and Mexican-American men, obesity prevalence decreases as income (PIR) decreases; 44.5% of non-Hispanic black men with income at or above 350% of the poverty level are obese compared with 28.5% of those with income below 130% of the poverty level. Similarly, among Mexican-American men, 40.8% of those with income at or above 350% of the poverty level are obese compared with 29.9% of those below 130% of the poverty level. There is no significant difference in obesity prevalence by poverty level among non-Hispanic white men.

Among women, obesity prevalence increases as income decreases.
Overall, 29.0% of women who live in households with income at or above 350% of the poverty level are obese and 42.0% of those with income below 130% of the poverty level are obese (Figure 1). Trends are similar for non-Hispanic white, non-Hispanic black, and MexicanAmerican women, but they are only significant for non-Hispanic white women. Among nonHispanic white women with income at or above 350% of the poverty level 27.5% are obese, less than the 39.2% of those with income below 130% of the poverty level.

Most obese adults are not low income (below 130% of the poverty level).

■ 2 ■

NCHS Data Brief ■ No. 50 ■ December 2010
Of the approximately 72 and a half million adults who are obese, 41% (about 30 million) have incomes at or above 350% of the poverty level, 39% (over 28 million) have incomes between 130% and 350% of the poverty level, and 20% (almost 15 million) have incomes below 130% of the poverty level. Among both men and women, most of the obese adults are non-Hispanic white with income at or above 130% of the poverty level. Approximately 21 million non-Hispanic white men and almost 21 million non-Hispanic white women who have incomes at or above…