Populus Tremuloides Essay

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Trembling Aspen and Large tooth Aspen
Populus tremuloides Michx. & Populus grandidentata Michx.
Peter Klyne
21 February 2013
NR216 Introductory Ecology
Frances Bennett-Sutton
Confederation College

Table of Contents
List of Figures……………………………………………………………………………………1 1.0 Introduction………………………………………………………………………………….2 2.0 Range………………………………………………………………………………………..2 3.0 Habitat……………………………………………………………………………………….4 4.0 Reproduction………………………………………………………………………………..5 5.0 Historical and Traditional Uses……………………………………………………………6 6.0 Conclusion…………………………………………………………………………………..7 7.0 Literature Cited……………………………………………………………………………...8

List of Figures
Figure 1: Map of North America shaded to indicate range of Populus tremuloides…….1
Figure 2: Map of North America shaded to indicate range of Populus grandidentata….2

1.0 Introduction
The Trembling Aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) and the Large Tooth Aspen (Populus grandidentata Michx.) are native species of North America. They both grow in singles and in multi-stemmed clones and also have the ability to reproduce both sexually and asexually. The trembling aspen has the widest distribution range of any native species in North America. Both species are easily reproduced and reforest disturbed sites faster than other species due to its fast growing habits, although their shade tolerance is low. 2.0 Range
Trembling Aspen has the largest range of any native species in North America. It extends from Newfoundland and Labrador west across Canada along the northern limit of trees to northwestern Alaska and southeast through the Yukon and British Columbia (Olson, 1990). To the south the range extends to the states of Minnesota, Iowa, Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, Pennsylvania and New Jersey in the East. (Rook, 2002)
The Large Toothed Aspen is similar in range to the trembling, but it does not extend as far west, east or north (Farrar, 1995), although it does extend into the United States to North Carolina, Illinois, Tennessee, Iowa, and North Dakota (Rook, 2002).

Figure 1 (left): Map of North America: shaded areas indicates the range that Populus tremuloides can be found. Little E.L. 1971. Atlas of United States Trees, volume 1. Department of Agriculture Miscellaneous Publication 1146. http://esp.cr.usgs.gov/data/little/. Retrieved February 18, 2013
Figure 2 (right): Map of North America: shaded areas indicates the range that Populus grandidentata can be found. Little E.L. 1971. Atlas of United States Trees, volume 1. Department of Agriculture Miscellaneous Publication 1146. http://esp.cr.usgs.gov/data/little/. Retrieved February 18, 2013

3.0 Habitat
The Trembling Aspen grows in a wide range of conditions and soil types. (Olson, 1990; Rook, 2002; Farrar, 1995; Baldwin; 1997). It has the ability to grow and survive in habitats with temperatures that range from lows of -570c to highs of 410c (Olson, 1990). Annual precipitation can vary wildly for the species. In interior Alaska, near the border of its northern range, the average yearly precipitation is 180mm. It is able to survive this low amount of precipitation because of low summer temperatures in Alaska that limit evaporation. This varies wildly with stands in Newfoundland where average yearly precipitation is 1020mm. (Olson, 1990). It can also be found in many different soil conditions. From shallow and rocky soils to deep, heavy clays (Rook, 2002; Olson, 1990). Growth is generally best on rich, moist loams or well drained silt or clay loams (Rook, 2002). Trembling Aspen is a pioneer species, in forest disturbance sites it is often one of the first species present in regrowth and often outcompetes other species in the early stages of redevelopment. It is also known as a ‘nurse’ crop, as in later stages conifers and other hardwoods will eventually outgrow the Aspen. (Farrar, 1995; Rook, 2002; Baldwin, 1997). It can be found in pure stands, or mixed stands with its close relative the Large…