Research Paper 2014

Submitted By Madalynn1998
Words: 1788
Pages: 8

Cystic Fibrosis; A Cure Will Be Found

Madalynn Grimsley
Mrs. Sasser
10th Grade Honors English
17 March 2014

Madalynn Grimsley
Honors English
Mrs. Sasser
March 17, 2014
Cystic Fibrosis; A Cure Will Be Found
Cystic Fibrosis is a severe inherited disease that produces liquid, which is slimy and sticky, that clogs up vital organs, mostly the lungs and pancreas (“Frequently” 1).CF is a disease of the secretory glands. The secretory glands are glands that create mucus and sweat. Just because CF in an inherited disease, doesn’t mean that the parents have it, the parents could be healthy, but have the faulty gene. Mucus is an element created by tissues that line organs and cavities, example such as lungs and nose. It prevents the drying out of those organs and fights organs (National 1). CF disturbs about 30,000 children and adults just in the U.S, and about 70,000 worldwide. CF is generally in Caucasians, but any race can be affected by the disease (“What” 1-2). Cystic Fibrosis is typically detected at an early age in life (Cystic 1). CF was acknowledged as a life-threatening disease in 1938 (Thomson and Harris 9). The brutality of CF and the time it is spotted are two factors that can tell how severe the case is (“Frequently” 3). Because of its causes and symptoms, Cystic Fibrosis (CF) affects the body and the life of its patients, but with the help of fundraisers, awareness, dedicated people and the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation, a cure can be found. CF is initiated because a child has inherited two duplicates of a gene that is defective, which means one from each parent (Thomson and Harris 8). In some, indicators begin during the early stages of life. A doctor will occasionally order a swear test to approve the diagnosis (“Frequently” 2). The signs and symptoms differ, depending on the harshness of the disease. Even in the same patient, indicators may get worse or progress as time passes (Mayo 1). Patients sometimes have difficulties with nutrition, absorption and breakdown of food, growth, and development (Cystic 1). CF can affect many parts of the body but it generally involves the lungs and stomach (Thomson and Harris). Some other symptoms include the respiratory system (Mayo 1). Symptoms can also have clubbing, which is the rounding and flattening of the fingers or even rectal prolapse. People with CF will regularly have salty sweat and/or skin (Cystic 1). That means that they tend to have abnormal levels of salt (Mayo 1). When you sweat, you lose salt, which can cause problems such as dehydration, increased heart rate, decreased blood pressure, weakness, heat stroke, and sometimes, death (National 1). People with CF usually have severe breathing complications and lung disease (Cystic 1). When mucus clogs the lungs, it can make breathing very challenging (“Frequently” 1). Mucus not only affects the lungs, it bothers the trachea and the bronchi (Thomson and Harris 16). Mucus blocks the tubes that transport air in and out of the lungs. A persistent cough due to the mucus and trying to clear the lungs, is not unusual in patients (Mayo 1). Because it is so hard to cough the secretion out, it stays in the lung, and it can cause many contaminations that damage the lungs. Mucus can block the digestive tract and pancreas (“Frequently” 1). Mucus can stop natural enzymes that help the body digest food (What 1). It can also causes bacteria to get stuck in the airways and cause swelling and infections that lead to lung damage (“Frequently” 1). When there is bacteria in the lungs, the amount of mucus will increase, which makes it even harder to breathe (Thomson and Harris 18). Most patients experience wheezing or shortness of breath (“What” 1). Some patients can experience inflammation of the nasal passages (Mayo 1). Small growths in the nose, called nasal polyps, are very common in patients with CF (“Frequently” 2). Most patients do not grow or gain weight like other children do (Cystic 1). CF can limit the ability…