Essay on Result: Health Care Strategy

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Result: Differentiate between the qualitative and quantitative aspects of the data described in the article in terms of descriptive statistics, inferential statistics, or both. Do you have enough information to make a decision on the effectiveness of the study?
I have to have two to three slides based off of this question above from the article below.
The Power of Integrating Consumerism and Wellness
Sharon, C William, CEBS; Tacker, Linh, CEBS. Benefits Quarterly26.1 (First Quarter 2010): 7-11.
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One aspect in our troubling economy that seems to be flourishing is the growing number of employers implementing consumer-driven health (CDH) plans and wellness programs. This article describes the primary areas of participant behavior that consumerism seeks to change and the fundamental factors a "consumer-focused" health care strategy must include. The authors outline issues employers must address when designing a successful incentive program and its accompanying communications strategy. A case study of a company that has a 70% enrollment rate in its CDH plans shows how an integrated consumerism and wellness strategy can slow the rate of health care cost increases for both the employee and employer. [PUBLICATION ABSTRACT]
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One aspect in our troubling economy that seems to be flourishing is the growing number of employers implementing consumer-driven health (CDH) plans and wellness programs. This article describes the primary areas of participant behavior that consumerism seeks to change and the fundamental factors a "consumer-focused" health care strategy must include. The authors outline issues employers must address when designing a successful incentive program and its accompanying communications strategy. A case study of a company that has a 70% enrollment rate in its CDH plans shows how an integrated consumerism and wellness strategy can slow the rate of health care cost increases for both the employee and employer.
INTRODUCTION
Employers sponsoring health care plans are expected to continue to face double-digit cost increases throughout 2010. According to a recent health care trend survey conducted by Aon Consulting, costs are expected to increase on average 10.5% next year.1 Key factors contributing to the rise of health care costs include poor lifestyle choices, the aging population, costly new technology and drugs, and overtreatment.
In today's economy, employers cannot absorb double-digit increases. Fortunately, employers are recognizing that by combining consumerism and wellness programs they can slow the rate of health care cost increases over a multiple-year time horizon. A growing number of employers are implementing consumer-driven health (CDH) plans and wellness programs. Today, an estimated 16 million people are enrolled in a CDH plan compared to only 7,000 individuals in 2001. More than 70% of employers have implemented a wellness program. The investment in CDH plans and wellness programs continues to increase each year. It's one aspect of our troubling economy that seems to be flourishing.
Persistent overtreatment is one of the main contributors to rapidly rising health care costs. According to Dr. Elliott S. Fisher, professor of medicine and community and family medicine, Dartmouth Medical School, one-third of U.S. health care spending is wasteful and may even be harmful. To help address the issue of overtreatment, Fisher suggests that provider incentives must change and health care consumers must be better informed. Consumers must learn to navigate the system differently and become smarter patients.
People can choose healthier lifestyles. Staying healthy reduces the demand for health care. According to the Department for Health and Human Services, medical care for persons with chronic disease accounts for 75% of the dollars spent as a nation on medical care.…