Social Studies Essay

Submitted By SarahBenson1
Words: 3403
Pages: 14

Assessment: SC2AS9b
Assessment: SC2AS9b

Retelling a Legend
Retelling a Legend

By: Sarah Benson
By: Sarah Benson

Introduction:

The Māori legend I have chosen is Rata and the tree, this legend is about a young man named Rata whose father had been recently murdered. When Rata learnt his father’s remains were on another land he wanted to seek revenge and went out into the forest so he could build a waka. He finds the tallest, straightest tree in the forest for the waka, but forgets to offer prayers to Tāne, the god of the forest, before cutting the tree down.

After several attempts to create a waka only to find the next day it had turned back into a tree again, Rata decides to stay in the forest and see who is playing tricks on him. When Rata see’s the birds and insects picking up the wood chips and reassembling the tree Rata became angry and demanded to know why they were doing this. The birds and insects explained how he had not asked permission from Tāne the God of the forest and when Rata realised his mistake he became ashamed of his actions and asks for forgiveness. The children of Tāne decide not to punish Rata because he is trying to help his village, and the next day carry the gift of a hollowed-out waka to Rata's village. Rata then becomes a respected leader in the community. (www.kiwinewz.com)

The legend of Rata and the forest has similarities to the legend of Maui and the magic fishhook, both legends are about asking for forgiveness from the gods. The legend of Maui and the magic fishhook tells the story of how whilst out fishing with his brothers in a canoe, Maui hauls a magnificent fish-land out of the sea that he caught on a hook made from the jawbone of his sorcerer grandmother. The fish-land is complete with houses and birds.
Maui is worried what the Gods will think about what he's done as he knew that this fish-land was indeed tapu (sacred) so he left his brothers in charge of the fish to go and seek forgiveness from Tangaroa the god of the sea.
His brothers argue over possession of the fish and throughout their struggle they leave marks from their weapons on the face of the fish. These marks are the valleys and mountains of New Zealand. (www.history-nz.org)

Creativity: - Create resources related to the Legend (ask the children to help). - After retelling the legend, ask the children to draw
Dance:
- Tree statues. (When sun comes up they stay still, and when the moon comes out they can move their arms like their blowing in the wind.

- Dance with ribbons that are colours of the sun and moon
Dance:
- Tree statues. (When sun comes up they stay still, and when the moon comes out they can move their arms like their blowing in the wind.

- Dance with ribbons that are colours of the sun and moon what they think the characters should look like.

Maths:
- Play matching games using characters from the legend.

- Play counting games counting the rays of the sun, how many hours during the day, how many birds are in a flock.
Maths:
- Play matching games using characters from the legend.

- Play counting games counting the rays of the sun, how many hours during the day, how many birds are in a flock.

Rata And The Tree.
Rata And The Tree.

Science:
- Look at the shadows and reflections from the sun and discussing how the moon also creates shadows at night as well.

- Talk about sunflowers and how the plants follow the movement of the sun throughout the day.
Science:
- Look at the shadows and reflections from the sun and discussing how the moon also creates shadows at night as well.

- Talk about sunflowers and how the plants follow the movement of the sun throughout the day.
Drama:
- Recreating the legend for the audience using resources.

- Acting out the legend to tell children.
Drama:
- Recreating the legend for the audience using resources.

- Acting out the legend to tell children.

I am…