Sports Medicine Essay

Submitted By heatedsnow2
Words: 2790
Pages: 12

Sports medicine
Poisons
A poison is a substance that causes injury, illness or death when taken into the body. A poison can be taken into the body in a variety of ways. Below are some of the ways they can be taken and a few examples.
Ingested- A poison that has been ingested means that the substance has been swallowed. Bleach, dishwasher detergent, and paint stripper are poisonous or corrosive if swallowed. Some types of medicine are also classified as ingested poisons.
Inhaled- A poison can also be inhaled meaning that it in been breathed in through the nose or the mouth. Some examples are Carbon Monoxide from car exhaust, Carbon Dioxide from sewers, and Chlorine from a pool, or fumes from household products like glue, paint, cleaners, or drugs.
Injected-Poisons can also be injected via a hypodermic needle directly into the blood stream. Injected poisons also enter the body through bites or stings of insects, spiders, ticks, marine life, snakes, and other animals
Absorbed-Absorbed poisons enter the body through the skin. Absorbed poisons include. Absorbed poisons are especially dangerous as they may enter the bloodstream and cause widespread damage. It is important to note that certain poisons such as agricultural chemicals or insecticides may enter the bloodstream through absorption while leaving the skin undamaged thus making them less visible.
First Aid for an unknown poison
If you, or someone in your care, may have been poisoned, do not wait for symptoms to occur. Call for advice or go to your nearest hospital Emergency Department. The following advice depends on the form of poisoning:
If the poison is swallowed
Give the person who has swallowed the poison a sip of water. Do NOT try to make them vomit
If safe to do so, take the poison container to the telephone. Alternatively, if the poison container is contaminated, note down the product name and any ingredients listed.
Call the Poisons Information Centre on 13 11 26.

If the poison is INHALED
Immediately get the person to fresh air, without placing yourself at risk.
Avoid breathing fumes.
If it is safe to do so, open doors and windows wide.
If the victim isn't breathing, start "mouth-to-mouth" resuscitation and call an ambulance on 000.
If safe to do so, take the poison container to the telephone. Alternatively, if the poison container is contaminated, note down the product name and any ingredients listed.
Call the Poisons Information Centre on 13 11 26.
If the poison enters the eye
Flood the eye with cold water from a running tap or a cup/jug.
Continue to flush for 15 minutes, holding the eyelids open.
If safe to do so, take the poison container to the telephone. Alternatively, if the poison container is contaminated, note down the product name and any ingredients listed.
Call the Poisons Information Centre on 13 11 26.
If the poison contacts the skin
Remove contaminated clothing, taking care to avoid contact with the poison.
Flood skin with running cold water.
Wash gently with soap and water and rinse well.
If safe to do so, take the poison container to the telephone. Alternatively, if the poison container is contaminated, note down the product name and any ingredients listed.
Call the Poisons Information Centre on 13 11 26.

Bites and stings-First Aid
Snake bites
Call medical help immediately if possible.
Remain calm; remember most snake bites are not fatal.
Minimise movement if possible. If you are hiking alone you may have to hike out for help.
If you are bitten on the arm or finger remove any rings, bracelets or watches. Loosen any tight clothing in case swelling occurs.
Apply a pressure bandage to the bitten limb. If the bite is to the head or neck, apply firm pressure to the bitten area. Do not restrict chest movement as breathing will be affected by this.
If there is no bandage or equivalent to apply a pressure bandage make note of any inflammation by tracing the edge of the swelling with a pen or the like near/around…