Stoichiometry Lab Report Essay

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Stoichiometry Lab Report
Brittney Aceron
Karla Wade­Choza, Jonathan Guerrero, Luis Martinez
Caroline Chen
March 11, 2013

Introduction In this lab, we mixed together the reactants, 0.05 moles of baking soda and some vinegar into a flask. The products were the carbon dioxide, water, and sodium acetate. After mixing these chemicals together, we boiled the flask until all the liquid in the solution was gone. The purpose of doing this experiment was to practice using stoichiometry in a real lab. The purpose of stoichiometry is to figure out how much of a product we will produce using the amount of the reactant that we initially started with. We used stoichiometry to calculate how many grams of sodium hydrogen carbonate (baking soda) we needed to use and to figure out how much of each of the ending products we should end up with. To find the amount of baking soda in grams, we found the molar mass of baking soda and then converted the initial information that we had, 0.05 moles of baking soda, into grams by multiplying 0.05 moles of baking soda with the molar mass of baking soda.

The calculation we used is below: Molar Mass of NaHCO
: 22.99+1.01+12.01+(16)3= 84.01
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Conversion from moles to grams: 0.05 moles of NaHCO3
× 84.01 grams of NaHCO3
3

1 mole of NaHCO3 = 4.2 grams of NaHCO

To find the concentration of the solution we made from mixing baking soda, water and vinegar together, we converted the grams of baking soda from the above calculations, to moles and then to liters. Then to find the molarity/ concentration we divided moles from liters.

The calculation we used is below: 1 mole of NaHCO3
Conversion from grams to moles: 4.2 grams of NaHCO3
× 84.01 grams of NaHCO3
= 0.05 moles of NaHCO
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Conversion from moles to liters: 0.05 moles of NaHCO3
× 22.4 liters of NaHCO3
3

1 mole of NaHCO3 =1.12 liters of NaHCO To find the predicted amount of sodium acetate we would get from this experiment, we changed moles of baking soda to moles of sodium acetate to grams of sodium acetate.
The calculation we used is below:
0.05 moles of NaHCO3 1 mole of NaCH3OO
× 1 mole of NaHco3 × 82.04 grams of NaCH3OO 1 mole of NaCH3COO = 4.1 grams of NaCH3OO
Materials
● 4.2 grams of baking soda
● 150 mL of vinegar
● 1 cup
● A 500 mL flask
● Stirring rod

● 30 ml of water
● Hot plate
● Graduated cylinder Methods
For this lab we started off by describing the physical properties of the reactants we were using, baking soda and vinegar. Then we measured the amount of baking soda we would need from the calculations that we did for homework and poured that amount into a cup. We tried to pour about 4.2 grams of baking soda into the cup. Then we wrote down the amount of baking soda that we actually used, which was about 5.6 grams. We put 30 mL of water into the cup with the baking soda and stirred it thoroughly majority of it was dissolved. Then we got a flask and weighed it. From there, we poured the baking soda from the cup into the flask. After, we got a graduated cylinder and measured our 150 mL of vinegar and poured that into the flask with the baking soda. But we didn’t pour it slow enough so is bubbled up and overflowed. After we finished that, we mixed it a little more and waited for the bubbles to die down. Then we set it on a heat plate where we let it sit for about an hour and when we came back and the water had evaporated from the flask, we observed the physical properties again and weighed the flask. Once we were done, we ended our experiment by cleaning everything up and washing out our flask. Data & Observations
DATA TABLE Actual amount of sodium hydrogen carbonate
(baking soda/NaHCO3) used:

5.6 grams

Expected (calculated) amount of sodium acetate to be produced:

4.1 grams

Mass of empty 500­mL flask:

116.9 grams

Mass of 500­mL flask after water has evaporated:…