Syllabus: Buddhism and weekly Discussion Questions Essay

Submitted By Tequan-Browning
Words: 1179
Pages: 5

Date: 8/22
Course Title: World Religions
Course Number: PHI-120-300
Semester: Fall 2014

I. Faculty Information:
A. Instructor: Dr. Al Campbell
B. Office Location:
C. Office Hours: By appointment
D. Mailbox Location:
E. Phone: 219.310.8064
F. E-mail: campbelle27@morainevalley.edu
G. Web Site: www.wolverton-mountain.com

II. Course Identification:
A. Credit Hours: 3 Semester Hours
B. Total Contact Hours: 3 Lecture: 3 Lab: 0
C. Days and Hours Course Meets: Online
D. Prerequisite: None
E. Corequisite: None
F. Catalog Description: Explores the principal doctrines (worldview), typical behavior (lifestyle) and sphere of influence of: Native American and African religions, Hinduism, Jainism, Buddhism, Sikhism, Chinese religions, Shinto, Zoroastrianism, Judaism, Christianity, Islam, and Baha’i. The course emphasizes comparison and examines themes such as view of God, condition of man, and requirements for a moral life.

III. Textbook:
Religions of the World, 10/e (or an older edition), Lewis M. Hopfe, Prentice Hall, 2007.

IV. Course Goals:
A. To explore the principal doctrines, typical behavior, and sphere of influence of seven of the world’s religions: Native American and African religions, Hinduism, Jainism, Buddhism, Sikhism, Chinese religions, Shinto, Zoroastrianism, Judaism, Christianity, Islam, and Baha’i.
B. To emphasize comparison between and examination of themes such as:
1. View of God
2. Condition of man
3. Requirements for a moral life
4. Relation to social and political forms
5. The rites and rituals associated with spiritual practices and holidays.

V. Course End Competencies:
A. The student will be able to define key terms specific to each religion.
B. The student will be familiar with and be able to describe methods of approach to religious studies.
C. The student will be able to compare and contrast the relation between doctrine, morality, faith and practice of each of the major world religions.
D. The student will have (re) evaluated his/her own views on religion. VI. Classroom Policies/Procedures:
A. General Information Sheet: (attached)
B. Withdrawal: A student who does not withdraw officially from a course may receive a grade of “F,” depending on course progress or course attendance, which will become a part of the student’s permanent record. The official withdrawal date is listed in the General Information Sheet.
C. Cheating/Plagiarism Policy: Any student found cheating or plagiarizing at anytime during the course will receive an “F” for that assignment and if done again will receive an “F” for the course.
D. Conduct: Each student is responsible for adhering to the Code of Student Conduct as stated in the college catalog.
E. Fine Arts and Humanities Departmental Statement of Academic Integrity: As educators in the arts and humanities, we strive to foster student responsibility, ethics, honesty and knowledge. We distinguish between valid reasons for copying--learning techniques and concepts, and appropriating content as part of the creative process--and outright theft of others' work, which is unacceptable. (Fall 2010)

VII. Evaluation Criteria:

Average-1
C Above Average-2
B Exemplary-3
A Score Evidence of critical thinking Beginning of understanding debating More probing questions and insights Extremely probing and insightful 500-word response to unit question An adequate response to one of my weekly discussion questions. An above average response to one of my weekly discussion questions. An excellent response to one of my weekly discussion questions. Responses to other students' 500-word posting in the Threaded Discussion 2-responses to other students' 500-word posting in the Threaded Discussion (one in which you agree with another student and the other is one in which you disagree or do not understand) 4-responses to other…