Synthesis: Fraternities and Sororities and Block Seating Essay

Submitted By Lkendallevanz
Words: 1100
Pages: 5

In the article “One man, one ticket, one seat” the debate on block seating is a controversial topic. The article expresses how many people find it unjust that block seating exists, as well as explains why many do not understand why fraternities are awarded privileges that others are not. The article argues point such as block seating being bias, discriminatory and secluded. Although many people are upset with block seating at the University of Alabama, I feel by changing it would ruin the tradition we intend to keep as well as rewarding the fraternities for their academic and social standings on campus.
The article argues that block seating is bias towards women and other minorities. The article quotes, “Sororities, for instance, regularly lead the greek community in grade point averages and community service and could expect prime placement if they applied for block seating. This year, though, only one sorority applied for and got block seating, while 28 all-male organizations received blocks.” This goes to show that the University is sort of kind of “favoring” the men of the greek community rather than the women. Although, they did say only one sorority applied for block seating, this goes to show that the women of the greek community are very comfortable with the tradition of block seating. Not only is blocked seating bias towards women but also other racial minorities as well. The greek organizations that fill most of the section are racially segregated. For women or other guests to have access to block seating they must be invited to sit in that particular section. Most of the time fraternities invite a big percentage of sorority women to sit with them during the game, so the sexual bias does not seem to be as big of problem until the application process begins.
Not only does the author account for the male bias issue of block seating the author analyzes the application process and the amount of seats fraternities are allowed to reserve for the home games. The fraternities have to complete an application that is reviewed and scored in order to receive their allowed blocked seating in the stadium. This year there was several improvements on the way that block seating applications were scored. Usually the applications were graded and reviewed by a student led committee; however, this year a machine graded the applications. Multiple fraternities benefitted from the new system of application grading while other fraternities suffered. The scoring process was not the only part of the system that was changed. This year the number of allotted seats had changed per fraternity as well. The Student Government Association (SGA) president Matt Calderone headed the new changes made to the block seating application system. Even though there were new changes to the block seating many people still felt secluded, but tradition was still maintained.
Tradition at the University of Alabama is held in high regards. The school revolves around tradition and thought to be one of the of the finest and most important aspects of the school. Although block seating carries on the tradition of greek system it seems to be degrading of women. As our country is growing and looking at women as equal the university is stuck in the “old ways”. In the past presidential election women were running for office for the title of being president of the United States, but here at The University of Alabama women are still not granted full opportunities such as being rewarded for leading grades and service for their school. Although this might seem unfair, many of the sororities do not even apply for block seating. The article states that, “This system is grossly unfair to women and minorities. Sororities, for instance, regularly lead the greek community in grade point averages and community service and could expect prime placement if they applied for block seating. This year, though, only one sorority applied for and got block seating, while 28 all-male…