Tester: Great Depression and Central Bank Essay

Submitted By amazon63
Words: 6829
Pages: 28

TEST JFHFH
1234
345 + 345 - 123 = 093
According to Moody's, Greece and Finland will turn "super-aged" next year. Eight countries, including France and Sweden, will have joined them by 2020.
Canada, Spain and the U.K. will be "super-aged" by 2025, and the U.S. will follow by 2030.
The problem isn't confined to Europe and North America. Singapore and Korea will be in that category by 2030, while China will also face "severe aging pressures."
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Aging populations create problems because there could be fewer working people to drive economic growth and support the retired population.
The report's authors say that this demographic trend will lead to a decline in household savings, which in turn will reduce global investment.
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But policymakers can minimize the impact by encouraging immigration to expand the workforce, and by investing in technology to help workers become more productive.
Other measures could include policies to keep people in work by raising the retirement age or enticing stay-at-home mothers to return to their jobs.

Despite improvement in certain areas of the economy, the Great Recession never truly ended for millions of Americans. Households across the nation are still trying to overcome a sluggish labor market, stagnant wages, and rising living costs. Making matters worse, the struggle does not appear to be ending anytime soon.

The Federal Reserve’s wealth effect is in short supply. According to a new report from the central bank, 25 percent of American households say their families are “just getting by” financially, and another 13 percent are “finding it difficult to get by.” Compared to five years earlier, 34 percent feel like they are worse off today, while the same number feel about the same. Only 30 percent repot that they were somewhat or much better off financially. The survey polled more than 4,100 respondents between September and October last year.

“Many households in the United States have been tested by the Great Recession. Large-scale financial strain at the household level ultimately fed into broader economic challenges for the country, and the completion of the national recovery will ultimately be, in part, a reflection of the well-being of house- holds and consumers,” explains the report.

Let’s take a look at fives signs that Americans are broke and struggling in the current economic environment.



Read more: http://wallstcheatsheet.com/personal-finance/5-signs-americans-are-flat-out-broke.html/?a=viewall#ixzz3B8yfnioB

Despite improvement in certain areas of the economy, the Great Recession never truly ended for millions of Americans. Households across the nation are still trying to overcome a sluggish labor market, stagnant wages, and rising living costs. Making matters worse, the struggle does not appear to be ending anytime soon.

The Federal Reserve’s wealth effect is in short supply. According to a new report from the central bank, 25 percent of American households say their families are “just getting by” financially, and another 13 percent are “finding it difficult to get by.” Compared to five years earlier, 34 percent feel like they are worse off today, while the same number feel about the same. Only 30 percent repot that they were somewhat or much better off financially. The survey polled more than 4,100 respondents between September and October last year.

“Many households in the United States have been tested by the Great Recession. Large-scale financial strain at the household level ultimately fed into broader economic challenges for the country, and the completion of the national recovery will ultimately be, in part, a reflection of the well-being of house- holds and consumers,” explains the report.

Let’s take a look at fives signs that Americans are broke and struggling in the current economic environment.



Read more:…