Theory of Multiple Intelligences and Young Adults Essay

Submitted By justinedney
Words: 1639
Pages: 7

Justin Edney
Assessment one
4/3/2013
DR. Michael J. Lenaghan

QUESTIONS: 1. What are the seven social sciences and how is each useful in your daily life? Psychology, Sociology, Anthropology, Geography, History, Political Science, Economics. They are important to us because we need them in order to live life as easy as we do. it measures the social developments of the society and finds the emerging drawbacks too. The work of social science is to watch where the society has been heading and what more can be done to benefit the entire race. If we dig out the historical evidences, we will find that social science has been a constant part of the development of the human race. It is interesting to know that great philosophers like Plato and Aristotle were advocates of social science and their philosophies are based on the objectives of social sciences only. 2. Describe each of the nine intelligences and describe your dominant intelligences.
My dominant intelligences are Musical Intelligence, Logical-Mathematical Intelligence and Bodily-Kinesthetic Intelligence. * Naturalist Intelligence (“Nature Smart”) designates the human ability to discriminate among living things (plants, animals) as well as sensitivity to other features of the natural world (clouds, rock configurations). This ability was clearly of value in our evolutionary past as hunters, gatherers, and farmers; it continues to be central in such roles as botanist or chef. It is also speculated that much of our consumer society exploits the naturalist intelligences, which can be mobilized in the discrimination among cars, sneakers, kinds of makeup, and the like. * Musical Intelligence (“Musical Smart”) Musical intelligence is the capacity to discern pitch, rhythm, timbre, and tone. This intelligence enables us to recognize, create, reproduce, and reflect on music, as demonstrated by composers, conductors, musicians, vocalist, and sensitive listeners. Interestingly, there is often an affective connection between music and the emotions; and mathematical and musical intelligences may share common thinking processes. Young adults with this kind of intelligence are usually singing or drumming to themselves. They are usually quite aware of sounds others may miss. * Logical-Mathematical Intelligence (Number/Reasoning Smart) Logical-mathematical intelligence is the ability to calculate, quantify, consider propositions and hypotheses, and carry out complete mathematical operations. It enables us to perceive relationships and connections and to use abstract, symbolic thought; sequential reasoning skills; and inductive and deductive thinking patterns. Logical intelligence is usually well developed in mathematicians, scientists, and detectives. Young adults with lots of logical intelligence are interested in patterns, categories, and relationships. They are drawn to arithmetic problems, strategy games and experiments.

* Existential Intelligence: Sensitivity and capacity to tackle deep questions about human existence, such as the meaning of life, why do we die, and how did we get here.

* Interpersonal Intelligence (People Smart”): Interpersonal intelligence is the ability to understand and interact effectively with others. It involves effective verbal and nonverbal communication, the ability to note distinctions among others, sensitivity to the moods and temperaments of others, and the ability to entertain multiple perspectives. Teachers, social workers, actors, and politicians all exhibit interpersonal intelligence. Young adults with this kind of intelligence are leaders among their peers, are good at communicating, and seem to understand others’ feelings and motives.

* Bodily-Kinesthetic Intelligence (“Body Smart”): Bodily kinesthetic intelligence is the capacity to manipulate objects and use a variety of physical skills. This intelligence also involves a sense of timing and the perfection of skills through mind–body union. Athletes,…