Types Of Tissue In The Body

Submitted By callyicea
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Types of Tissue in the body:
1. Epithelial tissues - are widespread throughout the body. They form the covering of all body surfaces, line body cavities and hollow organs, and are the major tissue in glands. They perform a variety of functions that include protection, secretion, absorption, excretion, filtration, diffusion, and sensory reception.

2. Connective tissues - bind structures together, form a framework and support for organs and the body as whole, store fat, transport substances, protect against disease, and help repair tissue damage. They occur throughout the body. Connective tissues are characterized by an abundance of intercellular matrix with relatively few cells. Connective tissue cells are able to reproduce but not as rapidly as epithelial cells. Most connective tissues have a good blood supply but some do not.

3. Muscle tissue is composed of cells that have the special ability to shorten or contract in order to produce movement of the body parts. The tissue is highly cellular and is well supplied with blood vessels. The cells are long and slender so they are sometimes called muscle fibres, and these are usually arranged in bundles or layers that are surrounded by connective tissue. Actin and myosin are contractile proteins in muscle tissue.

4. Nervous tissue is found in the brain, spinal cord, and nerves. It is responsible for coordinating and controlling many body activities. It stimulates muscle contraction, creates an awareness of the environment, and plays a major role in emotions, memory, and reasoning. To do all these things, cells in nervous tissue need to be able to communicate with each other by way of electrical nerve impulses.

Differences
-The epithelial tissue or epithelium in dermatology is a tissue composed of a layer of cells. In humans, it is one of four primary body tissues. Epithelium lines both the outside (skin) and the inside cavities and lumen of bodies. The outermost layer of our skin is composed of dead stratified squamous epithelial cells, as are the mucous membranes lining the inside of mouths and body cavities. Other epithelial cells line the insides of the lungs, the gastrointestinal tract, the reproductive and urinary tracts, and make up the exocrine and endocrine glands.

Functions of epithelial cells include secretion, absorption, protection, transcellular transport, sensation detection, and selective permeability. Endothelium (the inner lining of blood vessels) is a specialized form of epithelium.

-Connective tissue: is one of the four types of tissue in traditional classifications (the others being epithelial, muscle, and nervous tissue.) It is largely a category of exclusion rather than one with a precise definition, but all or most tissues in this category are similarly:
Involved in structure and support.
Derived from mesoderm (there are exceptions).
Characterized largely by the traits of non-living tissue.
Blood, cartilage, and bone are usually considered connective tissue, but because they differ so substantially from the other tissues in this class, the phrase "connective tissue proper" is commonly used to exclude those three. There is also variation in the classification of embryonic connective tissues; on this page they will be treated as a third and separate category. Also, labrums, facia, tendons, & ligaments are connective tissues.

Muscular tissue: provides for all body movement. Contracting muscles cause body parts to move. The three types of muscle tissue are skeletal, smooth, and cardiac. Skeletal Muscle Tissue Skeletal (voluntary) muscle fiber is striated, or striped, and is under the control of the individual's will (fig. 1-9). For this reason, it is often called “voluntary” muscle tissue. Skeletal muscle tissues are usually attached to bones. When muscle fibers are stimulated by an action of a nerve fiber, the fibers contract and relax. This interaction between muscle and nervous fibers produces movement

Smooth Muscle Tissue These…