Essay on Westminster System and House

Submitted By niifix
Words: 1216
Pages: 5

Statute Creation
FOR YOUR ASSIGNMENT, YOU WILL NEED TO EXPLAIN HOW PARLIAMENT MAKES WRITTEN LAWS (ACTS OF PARLIAMENT OR STATUTES). THIS WILL INVOLVE EXPLAINING EACH STAGE OF THE PROCESS AND GIVING EXAMPLES OF PREVIOUS ACTS.
STAGE 3 OF ENACTMENT: THE COMMITTEE STAGE
This is usually taken "upstairs" in a Standing Committee in the Commons, or as a "Committee of the Whole House" in the Lords. In Committee the clauses of the bill are examined individually and detailed amendments are considered. This is usually done by a group of cross-party MPs, and they may consult interested parties before reporting back.
STAGE 3 OF ENACTMENT: THE COMMITTEE STAGE
This is usually taken "upstairs" in a Standing Committee in the Commons, or as a "Committee of the Whole House" in the Lords. In Committee the clauses of the bill are examined individually and detailed amendments are considered. This is usually done by a group of cross-party MPs, and they may consult interested parties before reporting back.
STAGE 2 OF ENACTMENT: THE SECOND READING
This is a discussion of the general principles of the bill. Traditionally, Second Reading was always taken on the floor of the House, but in recent years some uncontroversial bills have been referred to a Second Reading Committee.

STAGE 2 OF ENACTMENT: THE SECOND READING
This is a discussion of the general principles of the bill. Traditionally, Second Reading was always taken on the floor of the House, but in recent years some uncontroversial bills have been referred to a Second Reading Committee.

STAGE 1 OF ENACTMENT: THE FIRST READING
This is purely formal and normally takes place without debate. It is a public announcement that the bill has been introduced, copies of the bill are available for members to read and a vote is taken as to whether to continue.

STAGE 1 OF ENACTMENT: THE FIRST READING
This is purely formal and normally takes place without debate. It is a public announcement that the bill has been introduced, copies of the bill are available for members to read and a vote is taken as to whether to continue.

ENACTMENT – GENERAL INFORMATION
The fourth process in ENACTMENT. It can start in either the House of Commons or the House of Lords (although because of the PARLIAMENT ACTS 1911 & 1949 money Bills are not allowed to start in the Lords). A current example of a Bill that started in the Lords is one to make shops close on Remembrance Sunday.
There are several different types of Bill such as Government Bills (for example the current Education Bill), and Private members Bills (like the current National Service Bill) but most of them follow the same process. We will assume we are starting in the House of Commons.
ENACTMENT – GENERAL INFORMATION
The fourth process in ENACTMENT. It can start in either the House of Commons or the House of Lords (although because of the PARLIAMENT ACTS 1911 & 1949 money Bills are not allowed to start in the Lords). A current example of a Bill that started in the Lords is one to make shops close on Remembrance Sunday.
There are several different types of Bill such as Government Bills (for example the current Education Bill), and Private members Bills (like the current National Service Bill) but most of them follow the same process. We will assume we are starting in the House of Commons.
INTRODUCTION
An idea for a new law must first be PROPOSED. This may involve the publication of a GREEN PAPER in which the general ideas will be set out.
Next is the CONSULTATION PROCESS in which interested parties are consulted about the proposed new law. At this point, a WHITE PAPER may be published with firm proposals in place.
The third process in the DRAFTING process, whereby the proposal is written up into a BILL by experts called parliamentary counsel.
INTRODUCTION
An idea for a new law must first be PROPOSED. This may involve the publication of a GREEN PAPER in which the general ideas will be set out.
Next is the CONSULTATION PROCESS in…