Writing and Sentence Essay

Submitted By dcovarrubias1
Words: 1518
Pages: 7

Study Guide
Extra Help 04/23/2013

Transitions - A Transitions are words or phrases that connect one idea to the next idea. First, next, after, and finally are examples of transitions. Ask the student to write simple directions for an activity with which they are familiar, such as making a sandwich, or making a bed. Then provide them with this list of transitions: first next then also as soon as after finally last Next, ask the student to insert a transition in the beginning of each step. Help the student to determine if the transitions he or she chose are appropriate for the passage.

Transitions - B Transitions are words or phrases that connect one idea to the next idea. First, next, after, and finally are examples of transitions. Ask the student to write simple directions for an activity with which they are familiar, such as making a sandwich, or making a bed. Then provide them with this list of transitions: first next then also as soon as after finally last Next, ask the student to insert a transition in the beginning of each step. Help the student to determine if the transitions he or she chose are appropriate for the passage.

Concluding Sentence - C A concluding sentence should restate the main idea and briefly summarize the paragraph. Recognizing an effective concluding sentence in reading materials will help students write their own concluding sentences. Choose a paragraph from a story or textbook the student uses at school. Have the student point out the concluding sentence. To make sure the concluding sentence is effective, ask the student if it restates the main idea and summarizes the information in the paragraph. Once the student can easily recognize concluding sentences, they can begin writing their own. Give the student a topic sentence. Have them write three sentences about that topic. Finally, have them write a concluding sentence that restates the main idea and briefly summarizes the rest of the paragraph.

Concluding Sentence - D A concluding sentence should restate the main idea and briefly summarize the paragraph. Recognizing an effective concluding sentence in reading materials will help students write their own concluding sentences. Choose a paragraph from a story or textbook the student uses at school. Have the student point out the concluding sentence. To make sure the concluding sentence is effective, ask the student if it restates the main idea and summarizes the information in the paragraph. Once the student can easily recognize concluding sentences, they can begin writing their own. Give the student a topic sentence. Have them write three sentences about that topic. Finally, have them write a concluding sentence that restates the main idea and briefly summarizes the rest of the paragraph.

Supporting Sentence A supporting sentence should help develop a story or bring a paragraph to life. This is the sentence where explanation and more detail about a certain subject are given. In the case of a narrative paragraph, in which the author is sharing a story, the supporting sentence may include dialogue, descriptions, or examples. Recognizing an effective supporting sentence in reading materials will help students write their own supporting sentences. This skill will allow students to write a supporting sentence that effectively and appropriately develops and supports the paragraph's direction. Practice: Choose a paragraph from a passage in a favorite book, magazine article, or textbook. Have the student identify a supporting sentence and why he or she has chosen that particular sentence. To make sure the supporting sentence is effective, ask the student if it adds explanation or development to the direction of the paragraph, or offers details about the subject or character. Once the student comprehends what is needed to create an effective supporting sentence, the student can begin writing supporting sentences. Give the student one of the following topics: football, music, favorite movie,…