Cloning: Cloning and ‘reproductive Cloning Essay

Submitted By nickiparry
Words: 1920
Pages: 8

Bioethics Paper
Nicole Parry
Biotech
Lancaster High School
November 5th 2012

Table Of Contents
1. TABLE OF CONTENTS……………………………............................................. Pg.1
2. ABSTRACT………………………………............................................................. Pg.2
3. Introduction……………………………….................................................... Pg.2
4. Background……………………………….................................................... Pg.2-3
5. Pros………………………………...................................................................... Pg.2-3
6. Cons………………………………..................................................................... Pg.4-6
7. Conclusion………………………………....................................................... Pg. 6
8. Appendex………………………………............................................................ Pg.7
9. WORK CITED………………………………......................................................... Pg.8

The highly controversial cloning debate is outlined by looking at different studies and past findings. A brief overview of cloning as well as a short history are given. Next, the useful aspects of cloning are touched upon focusing on the great benefits that would arise should cloning become legalized. Lastly, both the logistical and ethical problems associated with cloning are summarized. Ultimately, society as a whole has to make this decision because, in the end, all of the future generations will be effected.

July 5, 1996 was the birth of an organism that would change the science of biology forever. Not only would it affect science, but also the morals and values with which we live by. On July 5, 1996, Dolly the sheep, the first mammal to be cloned, was born (“Cloning Dolly the Sheep”, para. 7). From that point on to present day, there would be an ongoing debate regarding the legalization of cloning and whether scientists should be allowed to clone humans.
There are two forms of cloning: reproductive cloning and therapeutic cloning. Debate revolves around both types; however, there is more controversy regarding reproductive cloning. Reproductive cloning has the intent of reproducing a whole organism using a process called Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer (SCNT). SCNT is completed by taking the nucleus out of a donor egg and inserting the nucleus of another cell, which is from the organism who is supposed to be cloned. Then using electrical impulses the newly created cell begins to divide. This dividing cell is placed inside the body of the host organism and eventually divides enough to create a clone of the donor organism. On the contrary, with therapeutic, or research, cloning, a completely new organism is not the goal. Basically, the aim is to produce embryonic stem cells, which could later be used for treatment. Therapeutic cloning is more for human treatment rather than human creation (“Therapeutic Cloning vs. Reproductive Cloning”, para. 5).
Cloning opens up a whole new world of biological science allowing scientists to be able to help people like never before. One of the many uses of reproductive cloning is that it allows infertile couples to have biologically related children (“Arguments for ‘Reproductive Cloning’”, para. 6). Reproductive cloning allows reproduction to happen regardless of circumstances; it basically enables same-sex couples along with single parents to have children. Reproductive freedom and choice are expanded and positive characteristics will be more readily passed on from generation to generation. In addition, with reproductive cloning, parents would be able to produce ideal transplant donors who would be able to help out an ill existing family member (“Arguments for ‘Reproductive Cloning’”, para. 7).
Research cloning would allow new tissues and perhaps even new organs to grow in a natural way. These new organs and tissues would be able to “serve as backup systems for human beings” (“Arguments for ‘Reproductive Cloning’”, para. 4).
When organs such as…