Essay on CROSSFIT MEAL PLAN

Submitted By paulaabil
Words: 4745
Pages: 19

May 2004

ISSUE TWENTY-ONE

May 2004

Unfortunately, the full benefit of the Zone diet is largely limited to those who have at least at first weighed and measured their food.
For
a decade we’ve experimented with sizing and portioning strategies that avoid scales, and measuring cups and spoons only to conclude that natural variances in caloric intake and macronutrient composition without measurement are greater than the resolution required to turn good performance to great.
Life would be much easier for us were this not so!
The “meal plans” and “block chart” below have been our most expedient approach for eliciting the Zone’s best offering in athletes. Meal Plans
Our recommendation to “eat meat and vegetables, nuts and seeds, some fruit, little starch, and no sugar” is adequate to the task of preventing the scourges of diet-induced disease, but more accurate and precise prescription is necessary to optimize physical performance.
Finely tuned, a good diet will increase energy, sense of well being and acumen, while simultaneously flensing fat and packing on muscle. When properly composed the right diet can nudge every important quantifiable marker for health in the right direction. Diet is critical to optimizing human function and our clinical experience leads us to believe that Barry Sears’ “Zone Diet” closely models optimal nutrition.
CrossFit’s best performers are Zone eaters. When our second tier athletes commit to “strict” adherence to the Zone parameters they generally become top tier performers quickly. It seems that the Zone diet accelerates and amplifies the effects of the CrossFit regimen.

1

Void of theoretical or technical content this portal to sound nutrition still requires some basic arithmetic and weighing and measuring portions for the first week. Too many athletes after supposedly reading “Enter the
Zone” still ask, “So what do I eat for dinner?” They get meal plans and block charts. We can make the Zone more complicated or simpler but not more effective.
We encourage everyone to weigh and measure portions for one week because it is supremely worth the effort, not because it is fun. If you choose to “guestimate” continued page ... 10

May 2004

Meal Plans
“Blocks”

What is a Block?
A block is a unit of measure used to simplify the process of making balanced meals. 7 grams of protein = 1block of protein
9 grams of carbohydrate = 1 block of carbohydrate 1.5 grams of fat = 1 block of fat
(There is an assumption that there is about 1.5 grams of fat in each block of protein, so the total amount of fat needed per 1 block meal is 3 grams.)
When a meal is composed of equal blocks of protein, carbohydrate, and fat, it is 40 % carbohydrate, 30 % protein and 30% fat.

Sample Day Block requirements for small (“4 block”) male
Breakfast

Lunch

Snack

Dinner

Snack

Protein

4

4

2

4

24

Carbohydrate

4

4

2

4

4

Fat

4

4

2

4

4

Choose which body type best fits you to determine your block requirement. Breakfast Lunch Snack Dinner Snack

Total daily blocks

Body type

2

2

2

2

2

10

Small female

Pages 3 and 4 list common foods, their macronutrient category (protein, carbohydrate or fat), along with a conversion of measurements to blocks.

3

3

1

3

1

11

Medium female

3

3

2

3

2

13

Large female

This “block chart” is a convenient tool for making balanced meals. Simply choose 1 item from the protein list, 1 item from the carbohydrate list, and 1 item from the fat list to compose a 1 block meal. Or choose 2 items from each column to compose a 2 block meal, etc.

4

4

1

4

1

14

Athletic - well muscled female

4

4

2

4

2

16

Small male

5

5

1

5

1

17

Medium male

5

5

2

5

2

19

Large male

Here is a sample 4 block meal:

4

4…