Syllabus: Management and Case Study Essay

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OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT (MGCR 472)
Fall 2014
Sections 1 and 2
COURSE RELATED INFORMATION
INSTRUCTOR INFORMATION
Professor Derek Wang
Tel: (514) 398-1387
Office: 528
INSTRUCTOR’S OFFICE HOURS, E-MAIL AND MAILING ADDRESS INFO
Monday and Wednesday, 5:30 pm – 6:00 pm
Office Hours
Tuesday, 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm
E-mail
derek.wang@mcgill.ca
Desautels Faculty of Management, McGill University
Mailing Address
1001 Sherbrooke St (West), Montreal, Quebec, H3A 1G5
TA INFORMATION
Name
Hedayat Alibeiki
Hamidreza Eslami

Office Hour
Tue 4-5 pm
Thu 12-1 pm

Room
Bronfman 577
Bronfman 577

Email hedayat.alibeiki@mail.mcgill.ca hamidreza.eslami@mail.mcgill.ca

CLASS INFORMATION
Section No
1
2

Class Room
Bronfman 422
Bronfman 423

Lecture Time
Mon Wed 4:05-5:25pm
Mon Wed 2:35-3:55pm

Important Note: McGill University values academic integrity. Therefore all students must understand the meaning and consequences of cheating, plagiarism and other academic offences under the Code of Student Conduct and Disciplinary Procedures (see www.mcgill.ca/integrity for more information).

COURSE RELATED INFORMATION
PERFORMANCE EVALUATION
5 Assignments (the best 4 of them will be graded) 1 Case Study Reports
Midterm Exam
Final Exam

16% (4*4%)
14 %
25 %
45 %

COURSE DESCRIPTION AND LEARNING OUTCOMES


Course Description

Operations management (OM) involves design, planning, establishment, control, operation and improvement of the activities/processes that create a firm's final products and/or services. At one time, the term "operations management" referred primarily to manufacturing issues. The growing economic importance of service activities, however, has broadened the scope of OM function (in fact, the course will focus more on service facilities). Large scale globalization, short product life cycle and more informed customers means that successful management of operations, careful design and efficient utilization of resources is an absolute must not only to add to the bottom line of a firm, but even for its mere survival.
OM is a highly dynamic and expanding field of management. In this course, we will study both manufacturing and service operations, emphasizing their differences as well as similarities. We will examine the role of operations management in the organization by exploring a number of concepts and techniques. The interaction of operations with other business areas and environmental factors, and how operations management can contribute to the achievement of organizational goals, also will be discussed.


Course Learning Outcomes

The objective of the course is to develop your understanding of the major concepts and trade-offs involved in making OM decisions. At the end of this course, you will:
1. Recognize the important role of operations in an organization’s success
2. Develop a comprehensive understanding of operational issues and decisions and how they relate to each other, and to other areas of the organization and its environment
3. Understand related operational and economical concepts and techniques
4. Apply these techniques
At the end of the course, you will be able to:
1. Identify the fundamental managerial trade-off in an operations decision environment
2. Develop a decision model and formulate an appropriate objective
3. Evaluate alternative solutions and analyze the objective to optimize the decision
4. Utilize data, models, techniques, and tools to determine the optimal solution

COURSE MATERIALS


Recommended Texts:

(SH) Stevenson and Hojati, Operations Management, 4th Canadian Edition, Publisher:
McGraw-Hill Ryerson.
(ACDvMZ) Anupindi, Chopra, Deshnukh, van Mieghem and Zemel, Managing Business
Process Flows: Principles of Operations Management, 3rd Edition, Publisher: Pearson Prentice
Hall.
(Luehrman 1998) Luehrman, T.A., Investment opportunities as real options: Getting started on the numbers, Harvard Business Review, vol. 76, pages 51--66, 1998.
The textbooks are not required, but are recommended. The problems at the end of…