Completing a Cv Essay

Submitted By suttonct
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Pages: 5

When to Use a Curriculum Vitae
When should job seekers use a curriculum vitae, commonly referred to as CV, rather than a resume? In the United States, a curriculum vitae is used primarily when applying for academic, education, scientific or research positions. It is also applicable when applying for fellowships or grants.
When asking for a job in Europe, the Middle East, Africa, or Asia, expect to submit a CV rather than a resume. Keep in mind that overseas employers often expect to read the type of personal information on a curriculum vitae that would never be included on an American resume, such as date of birth, nationality and place of birth. United States law on what information job applicants can be asked to provide does not apply outside the country.
The Differences between a Resume and a CV
There are several differences between a curriculum vitae and a resume. A curriculum vitae is a longer (up to two or more pages), more detailed synopsis of your background and skills. A CV includes a summary of your educational and academic backgrounds as well as teaching and research experience, publications, presentations, awards, honors, affiliations and other details. As with a resume, you may need different versions of a CV for different types of positions.
Like a resume, a curriculum vitae should include your name, contact information, education, skills and experience. In addition to the basics, a CV includes research and teaching experience, publications, grants and fellowships, professional associations and licenses, awards and other information relevant to the position you are applying for. Start by making a list of all your background information, then organize it into categories. Make sure you include dates on all the publications you include.
A curriculum vitae, or CV, is an alternative to writing a resume. A resume is typically a page or two in length, while a CV is more detailed and longer. Here's more in the difference between a resume and a CV.
CVs are traditionally used by those in academia and research. CVs vary depending on one's field and experience, but there are a number of general guidelines one can follow when creating a CV.
Here are tips for choosing a font style and size, CV length, format, and what to include in your curriculum vitae.

CV Style and Format
CV Length: While resumes are generally one page long, CVs are longer. Most CVs are at least two pages long, and often much longer.
Font and Size: Do not use ornate fonts that are difficult to read; Times New Roman, Arial, Calibri, or a similar font is best. Your font size should be between 10 and 12 points, although your name and the section headings can be a little larger and/or bolded.
Format: However you decide to organize the sections of your CV, be sure to keep each section uniform. For example, if you put the name of one organization in italics, every organization name must be in italics.
If you include a sentence or two about your accomplishments in a particular position, fellowship, etc., make a bullet list of each accomplishment. This will keep your CV organized and easy to read.
Accuracy: Be sure to edit your CV before sending it. Check spelling, grammar, tenses, names of companies and people, etc. Have a friend or career services counselor check over your CV as well.

What to Include on Your CV
Contact information: At the top of your CV, include your name and contact information (address, phone number, email address, etc.). Outside of the US, many CVs include even more personal information, such as gender, date of birth, marital status, and even names of children. Unless you are applying to a job outside of the United States, you do not need to include this extra information.
Education: This may include college and graduate study. Include the school attended, dates of study, and degree received.
Honors and Awards: This may include dean's list standings, departmental awards, scholarships, fellowships, and…