Different types of schools unit 6 Essays

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Different types of schools
Characteristics of this type of school including ownership, management, finance and curriculum they follow
Primary (infants & Junior)

Secondary:

Primary schools cater for children aged 4-11. While at primary school, children start with the Early Years (Foundation) curriculum, followed by Key stage 1 and Key stage 2 of the national curriculum

Secondary schools cater for children aged 11- 16 or 18. They take pupils through key stages 3 and 4 of the National curriculum

The majority of state schools are maintained by the Local Authority (LA). Maintained schools follow the national curriculum, national pay and conditions and are overseen by the LA. There are 4 main types of maintained schools State schools in England must teach a range of subjects according to targets set by the National Curriculum. This was established in 1989 to ensure the same standards of teaching and learning across the nation.
The National Curriculum covers learning for all children aged 5-16 in state schools, and sets out: which subjects should be taught the knowledge, skills and understanding your child should achieve in each subject (according to your child’s age) targets - so teachers can measure how well your child is doing in each subject how information on your child’s progress should be passed on to you

Pre-preparatory School
Independent schools that traditionally specialise in helping children aged from 4-7 prepare for entry to preparatory schools.
An Independent school does not rely on the LA financially and are governed by a board of directors. The school sets its own curriculum for the children in attendance to follow.
Preparatory School
A fee-paying independent school for children of the ages of 8-13, often preparing them for entry into public schools or other secondary level independent schools.

An Independent school does not rely on the LA financially and are governed by a board of directors. The school sets its own curriculum for the children in attendance to follow.
Public School ( single Sex)
A group of older, more expensive and exclusive fee-paying school, which cater primarily for children aged between 13 and 18. Traditionally, these were boys' boarding schools, although most now allow day pupils and many have turned either partially or fully co-educational. They emerged from charity schools established to educate poor scholars, the term "public" being used to indicate that access to them was not restricted on the basis of religion, occupation, or home location, and that they were subject to public management or control,in contrast to private schools which were run for the personal profit of the proprietors.
Independent Grammar schools
Secondary schools that select all their pupils on the grounds of high academic ability
An Independent school does not rely on the LA financially and are governed by a board of directors. The school sets its own curriculum for the children in attendance to follow
Main types of state school:
Characteristics of this type of school including ownership, management, finance and curriculum they follow

A Mainstream state school. Funded by the LA. They will also have to follow the national curriculum. This type of school include:
Community school
These are run and owned by the LA. This will also support the school through looking to develop links with the local community and by providing support services. They will also usually determine the admissions policy.
Foundation and Trust schools
These are run by their own governing body which determines the admissions policy in consultation with the LEA. The school land and buildings are owned by the governing body or a charitable trust with an outside partner, such as a business. The school will have to buy in any support services. The decision to become a support school with be made by the governing body in consultation with parents.
Voluntary aided schools
These are mainly religious or faith schools although anyone can apply for a…