Essay on Morality and Animal Rights Theory

Submitted By King_mars23
Words: 1000
Pages: 4

University of Phoenix Material

Thesis Statement and Outline

What is your thesis statement? My thesis statement concerns about ethics and morality also extend to matters associated with the treatment of animals. The purpose of this discussion is to summarize and critique several different theories associated with the ethical treatment of animals.

I. Introduction: Ethics and morality have consistently been topics of concern in our society. Concerns about ethics and morality also extend to matters associated with the treatment of animals. The purpose of this discussion is to summarize and critique several different theories associated with the ethical treatment of animals. The discussion will focus on the treatment of animals as it relates to hunting and trapping animals, eating animals, using animals for research, and the manner in which domestic and wild animals are treated. The research will summarize and critique four theories including anthropocentrism, Animal Liberation, Strong Animal Rights Theory, and Weaker animal rights theory.
II. Anthropocentrism
A. Definition
1. The belief that human beings are the central.
2. The assessment of reality through an exclusively human perspective.
B. How Anthropocentrism theory asserts
1. Animals are not human they do not possess logic.
2. They should not be treated in a manner that is logical or human.
III. Animal liberation
A. How it posits.
1. Non-human animals should be given the same consideration as humans.
2. It relates to their right to live and be free of torment.
B. Defined
1. The rights of animals to be protected from exploitation and abuse by humans
2. The right to humane treatment claimed on behalf of animals, especially the right to be treated as persons or more like persons under the law.
IV. Strong Animal Rights Theory A. How it asserts
1. That every normal mammal over a year of age has the same rights as human beings.
2. that is all mammals have the same right to live or die as humans do.
B. The three stages
1. The first stage asserts that mature mammals are both conscious and also have other mental abilities (Warren). These abilities are inclusive of memory emotion, belief, desire, intentional actions and an awareness of the future.
2. The second stage of this theory asserts that subjects of a life are independent of one another. This argument is used to refute the idea that utilitarianism which asserts that living things are only vessels of morally significant value (Warren). As such damage done to one living thing may be permissible because it may provide some benefit to other living things. This is that argument used to justify using animals for medical research.
3. The third stage of the theory asserts that because living things have inherent value they mustn’t be harmed. The third stage of the theory further asserts that there are moral rights attributed to things with inherent value. This means not only should living things not be harmed but human being should intervene or come to the assistance of other living organisms when they are in danger of being harmed (Warren).
V. Weaker Animal Right Theory
A. What this theory argues about
1. Any living organism that has the capacity to pursue certain satisfactions also has a right not to be forced to live without being able to pursue such satisfactions (Warren).
2. Also argues that any living organism that has the capacity to feel pain and hurt should have the right to live without having pain or hurt inflicted upon it unless there is a persuasive reason to argue the contrary. B. What it asserts
1. A general rule living things that can pursue satisfaction.
2. Feel pain have a right to exist without being denied the ability to pursue satisfaction or have pain forced upon them.
VI. Anthropocentrism Anthropocentrism views human being as the center of the universe and regards the world…