Essay on HOW TO BE AWESOME

Submitted By pRESTON_fw
Words: 4145
Pages: 17

Mr. PrestonWL is the author of Heart of many colors, THE DRAIN, and Midna`s Stone. Although the titles are interesting, the books themselves are NOT!! His teacher, Ms. Stephanie Jordet, is a HORRIBLE teacher for encouraging insensate "Literary Genius" PrestonWL. PrestonWL is not a Literary Genius nor will he never be, hence the reason he failed Language Arts and my expections!!! Before the pen touches the paper with the first word of your personal experience essay you should consider a basic points that will help your essay be a success.

The purpose of the personal experience essays is to share and elaborate on an appealing experience from your life. A personal essay is sometimes even called a life experience essay and can be difficult to write for many students.
A personal experience essay focuses on your experience and the importance of that experience and impact that it has on you.
The outline of a personal experience essay follows the common structure for all the essays. Your essay on experience starts with an intro, then the main body and finally summing up the ideas in the conclusion. Try and describe the events and experiences in the chronological order in, as it allows you to present experiences as they happened.
To make your personal experience essay exciting you should start with choosing the relevant experience to base your essay upon. Describe a situation that you consider to be crucial in your development. I have learned a great many things from participating in varsity football. It has changed my entire outlook on and attitude toward life. Before my freshman year at [high-school], I was shy, had low self-esteem and turned away from seemingly impossible challenges. Football has altered all of these qualities. On the first day of freshman practice, the team warmed up with a game of touch football. The players were split up and the game began. However, during the game, I noticed that I didn't run as hard as I could, nor did I try to evade my defender and get open. The fact of the matter is that I really did not want to be thrown the ball. I didn't want to be the one at fault if I dropped the ball and the play didn't succeed. I did not want the responsibility of helping the team because I was too afraid of making a mistake. That aspect of my character led the first years of my high school life. I refrained from asking questions in class, afraid they might be considered too stupid or dumb by my classmates. All the while, I went to practice and everyday, I went home physically and mentally exhausted.

Yet my apprehension prevailed as I continued to fear getting put in the game in case another player was injured. I was still afraid of making mistakes and getting blamed by screaming coaches and angry teammates. Sometimes these fears came true. During my sophomore season, my position at backup guard led me to play in the varsity games on many occasions. On such occasions, I often made mistakes. Most of the time the mistakes were not significant; they rarely changed the outcome of a play. Yet I received a thorough verbal lashing at practice for the mistakes I had made. These occurrences only compounded my fears of playing. However, I did not always make mistakes. Sometimes I made great plays, for which I was congratulated. Now, as I dawn on my senior year of football and am faced with two starting positions, I feel like a changed person.

Over the years, playing football has taught me what it takes to succeed. From months of tough practices, I have gained a hard work ethic. From my coaches and fellow teammates, I have learned to work well with others in a group, as it is necessary to cooperate with teammates on the playing field. But most important, I have also gained self-confidence. If I fail, it doesn't matter if they mock or ridicule me; I'll just try again and do it better. I realize that it is necessary to risk failure in order to gain success. The coaches have always said before games that nothing is…