Week 2 Knowledge Check Study Guide Essay

Words: 1776
Pages: 8

Week 2 Knowledge Check Study Guide
Concepts

Mastery

The stages of decision making 100%

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Organizational decision making Questions

Rhetorical devices I, rhetorical devices II, rhetorical devices III, rhetorical devices IV, and proof surrogates and repetition Fallacies that involve appeals to emotion, some

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Score: 15 / 15

non-emotion-based

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fallacies, and two wrongs make a right
The ad hominem fallacy, the genetic fallacy, straw man, false dilemma, slippery slope, misplacing

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the burden of proof, and begging the question
Concept: The stages of decision making
Mastery

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Questions

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1.
Which stage of the decision-making process precedes the stage of
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Correct:
The Correct Answer is: C.
Weaselers tend to weaken claims. They tend to reduce the accountability of the speaker. 9.
Harry bumps into Lee, one of his friends from school. They decide to catch up over some drinks. After a few drinks, Lee excuses himself to go outside and smoke a cigarette.
When Lee comes back, Harry asks him, "Have you always been a chain smoker?" Which rhetorical device has Harry used in this scenario?

A.

A euphemism

B.

A loaded question

C.

A downplayer

D.

A weaseler

Correct:
The Correct Answer is: B.
Harry has used a loaded question in this scenario. A loaded question involves an implied assumption that is usually unjustified or unwarranted.

Concept: Fallacies that involve appeals to emotion, some non-emotion-based fallacies, and two wrongs make a right
Mastery

100%

Questions

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10.
Which of the following is true of using outrage to support an argument?

A.

It justifies the speaker's point of view.

B.

It makes it easier for the audience to accept the speaker's views. C.

It always helps the audience to rationally evaluate the speaker's argument.

D.

It does not influence the audience's evaluation of an issue.

Correct:
The Correct Answer is: B.
The use of outrage to support an argument makes it easier for the audience to accept the speaker's views. When using outrage in an argument, it is easy to become illogical.
11.
In the context of non-emotion based fallacies, which of the