Essay about Final Exam Study Guide

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AOE (MSE) 3094
Final Exam Review
Part 1

Fundamentals of Materials Science and Engineering: An Integrated Approach, 3rd Edition, by
William D. Callister, Jr, and David G. Rethwisch, ISBN: 978-0-470-12537-3. © 2008 by John
Wiley and Sons, Inc. All rights reserved.
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AOE (MSE) 3094
Final Exam
04 May 2012

Name____________________________________
(Print legibly)
Signature_________________________________
(I have neither given nor received unauthorized assistance on this test.)

Aids Allowed; Items Needed
Closed book. Three handwritten pages, front and back, of formulas, definitions, diagrams, etc., are allowed.
Tables or graphs that might be needed are given. Bring paper, full 8.5 × 11 inch size, calculator, and straightedge. Instructions (Points may be deducted for failure to follow instructions.)
• Work on one side of paper only. Paper must be full 8.5 × 11 inch size.
• For each major problem, 1, 2, 3, etc., start work on the question page where space permits, and continue on additional pages of your own paper as needed, with these additional pages inserted behind the corresponding question page. Do not combine work for more than one problem on any page of your own paper.
• To hand in your work, staple everything together in order by problem number. Keep your formula pages.
• Clarifications or other information may be written on the blackboard -- check it before handing in your paper.
• Logic and calculations leading to all answers must be given, and any points or lines used from graphs must be marked and labeled.
• For discussion or explanation type questions, answers need to be in complete sentences and in reasonably good
English, and the logic must be clear.
• Numerical answers should have neither insufficient nor excessive numbers of significant figures, and correct units are required for full credit.
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Chapter 1: Introduction

Chapter 2: Atomic Structure and
Interatomic Bonding

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Fig. 2.9 Ionic bonding, NaCl

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Fig. 2.10 Covalent bonding, CH4
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Fig. 2.11 Metallic bonding 6

Fig. 2.15 HF

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Chapter 3: Structures of Metals and Ceramics

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Fig. 3.1 Face-centered cubic
(FCC) crystal structure
APF = 0.74
4 atoms/(unit cell)

a 2 2R
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Fig. 3.2 Body-centered cubic (BCC) crystal structure
APF = 0.68
2 atoms/(unit cell)

4R a 3
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APF = 0.74

Fig. 3.3 Hexagonal close-packed (HCP) crystal structure.
The unit cell is A-B····H, but the larger hexagonal prism is easier to understand. 11

Theoretical density calculation



nA
VC N A

n  atoms/cell ,

A  atomic weight, g/mol

VC  Vcell  unit cell volume, cm3
N A  Avogadro' s number  6.02  10 23 atoms/mol

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Fig. 3.5
NaCl structure
CN = 6
MgO
FeO
TiC
ZrC

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Crystal - quartz

Amorphous - glass

Fig. 3.40 Two-dimensional schematics of SiO2 structures

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Chapter 4: Polymer Structures

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Polyethylene
(PE)
repeat unit = mer

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Repeat units (mers) for some other polymers polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE)

poly(vinylchloride)
(PVC)

polypropylene
(PP)
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Spherulites in crystalline polyethylene

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Chapter 5: Imperfections in Solids

Types of imperfections in crystals
- point: vacancy, interstitial
- line: dislocations
- interfacial: grain boundary, twin boundary

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Point defects in a metal crystal
- the impurity atoms are in solid solution

interstitial impurity

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From: Mechanical Behavior of Materials: Engineering Methods for Deformation,
Fracture, and Fatigue, 3rd edition, by Norman E. Dowling. ISBN 0-13-186312-6.
© 2007 by Pearson Education, Inc., Upper Saddle River, NJ. All rights reserved.

Equilibrium number of vacancies
Vacancies spontaneously form in a solid, with the number increasing with temperature.

 Q 
Nv  N exp   v 
 kT 
Nv  number of vacancies
N  number of…