The Boy in the Striped Pajamas Essay

Submitted By faithemiller
Words: 700
Pages: 3

This family was tossed forcefully, some willing and some not, from a beautiful and care-free environment, into a new one that did not feel, or could ever feel, like the home they were used to. The atmosphere of their new location was bland, and close-quartered. At the beginning of the film, Bruno had the ability to freely play with his friends out in the public streets, like a normal kid. But when the family relocated for his fathers promotion, the farthest he was allowed to wander off to was the parameter of the house, which was inside the gates being protected by watchmen. Imagine going from a beautifully scenic home, to a strictly-monitored home that did not believe in the importance of aesthetics, and was constantly being bombarded by soldiers. Bruno was the main character and his main characteristic was having explorer's blood - he didn't play by his parents' rules, or anyone’s rules for that matter; he was curious. You can't expect a child of his age to move into that type of environment and not expect an explanation of some sort as to why he is being limited. He took matters into his own hands throughout the whole film, which landed him into trouble. You can't stop a curious child with a passion for exploring. Psychologically, the family had split opinions at first: the father and Gretel were happy in their new home, whereas the wife and Bruno were not sold on their new arrangements. The wife put up with it to keep her husband happy, but Bruno was very direct about his feelings of loneliness and confusion. Gretel, on the other hand, soon after moving, had been brainwashed by her tutor into thinking the Jews were the enemy (the son did not listen to the tutor, so he had no recollection of anything), but none of them knew the extent of lies they were being told by their husband/father. Upon finding out what her husband was really engaging in, the psychological elements and emotion of this story climaxed intensely. The scene that brought awareness of the truth was the mother/wife conversing with the young officer outside of the car. The comment made by him after smelling the bodies of the Jews, and seeing the smoke in the distance, alarmed the wife/mother which brought panic, betrayal, and depression upon her for the rest of the film. She then realized what the “farm” was being used for. The whole situation grew more and more sickening to her, until she finally realized that she and her kids deserved to be in a better environment, away from such a disgusting, shameful place. Her husband allowed them to…